Outsourcing The Jewish Exponent: Whose Fault Is this?

Yesterday it was announced that The Jewish Exponent, Philadelphia’s communal Jewish The_Jewish_Exponent_frontpagepublication since 1887, cut most of its staff and outsourced its production to Mid-Atlantic Media, based out of Maryland. Whose fault is this? Social media is already abuzz with finger pointing.

Many commenters are blaming The Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia. Federation is being accused of mismanagement and a desire not to invest the necessary funds to keep The Jewish Exponent going locally. Some members of the Jewish community have complained for a long time that they did not feel that their voices were being included in the Exponent’s pages.

The Philadelphia Jewish Voice was founded ten years ago to address the last complaint. People who felt excluded from the communal conversation taking place in The Jewish Exponent were invited to submit their articles to The Philadelphia Jewish Voice. Unlike The Exponent’s paper editions, The Philadelphia Jewish Voice is issued exclusively online. It has only one paid staffer. The rest of the contributors are volunteers.

The Jewish Exponent and The Philadelphia Jewish Voice have complemented each other these past ten years. Each offered something that the other did not, thus meeting the needs of different segments of the Jewish community. I am The Philadelphia Jewish Voice’s immediate past president. Lisa Hostein, The Exponent’s editor, is a dear friend of mine. I have published articles in the Exponent. We coexisted in a spirit of collegiality and mutual respect.

It is not Federation’s fault that The Jewish Exponent is being outsourced. It is not The Philadelphia Jewish Voice’s fault that fifteen of our friends and colleagues were laid off. It is the whole community’s fault. A communal publication cannot exist without the community’s support. In the past, every Jewish family in the area would get The Jewish Exponent to stay on top of the news of the community. It was very important to people to announce engagements, marriages, births, and deaths in The Exponent.

Over the past 25 years, I have observed a change in our community. People are so busy fighting each other that our institutions are collapsing. Federation is no longer getting the communal support it used to command. Jews no longer feel that they need to belong to a synagogue in order to be members of the community. Many of the younger Jews do not feel a connection to Israel or Zionism. Many Jews don’t bother reading about news in the community at all. The Jewish Exponent’s sales plummeted from 80,000 to 24,000 per week.

It has been reported that The Jewish Exponent’s annual deficit grew to $300,000. The Jewish Federation made the difficult but fiscally unavoidable decision for The Jewish Exponent. The status quo was unsustainable. Let this be a wake up call to everyone! We cannot take our institutions and our sense of communal identity for granted. We need to invest more of ourselves, including our financial resources, in our communal infrastructure.

 

 

The Philadelphia Jewish Voice Celebrates 10 Years

Many thanks to everyone who came to our 10th anniversary celebration. Philadelphia Jewish Voice President Bonnie Squires welcomed the sell-out crowd, served as M.C., thanked our gracious hosts Mark and Judi Aronchick for opening up their beautiful home to us, and praised David and Debra Magerman of Six Points Kosher Events for their generous donation of the lavish buffet. They even sent along Jim, their wonderful staff person, to arrange all the platters.

The event raised $12,000 to support our paper. Founder and publisher Dan Loeb spoke about his inspiration ten years ago in creating our community all-volunteer newspaper. (His remarks are below the photo.) Dan then made a presentation on behalf of our board of directors to our immediate past president Ronit Treatman for her devotion and leadership.

Ronit gave a gracious acceptance, loved the silver Menorah which Dan had presented, and her parents and many family members among the crowd were beaming.

Dan Rottenberg, the legendary editor, author and publisher, read from one of his opinion pieces, published years before the founding of the Philadelphia Jewish Voice, calling for a Jewish community publication which would be diverse in nature and opinion. He proved to have been clairvoyant.

State Senator Daylin Leach then gave the keynote address, analyzing various legislative issues in the state capital, including medical marijuana and marriage equality, while commenting on gerrymandering and urging reform. He peppered his comments with his usual wit.

Montgomery County Coroner Walter Hofman, M.D., and Lower Merion Township Commissioners President Liz Rogan were among the luminaries who enjoyed the evening.

PJVoice board

The Philadelphia Jewish Voice board of directors. Left to right: Lisa Grunberger, Dan Loeb (secretary), Bonnie Squires (president), Ronit Treatman, Jessica Weingarten, Daylin Leach, Charlie Smolover (former board member), Perry Dane, Ken Myers (vice-president). Not shown but present: Eric Smolen (treasurer), Debbie Rosan. Photo by Helen Loeb.

Remarks by the Publisher

Ten years ago, we were simply members of the Philadelphia Jewish community who sought a paper which would give voice to all parts of our community, and address its critical issues in a spirit of intellectual honesty and diversity. We called ourselves The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

In 2010, we moved from a monthly webzine format to “blog” format that could be updated daily. All of our writing is done by our team of exceptional “citizen journalists.” Our volunteers allow us to stay on top of the day’s news with analysis from a wide range of viewpoints, from writers like Rabbi Arthur Waskow to Lori Lowenthal Marcus.

We highlight various groups in order to advance worthy endeavors in our community and encourage networking. We interview prominent politicians, candidates and leaders, letting them speak directly to our readers on issues of concern to the Jewish community while keeping a permanent record of their promises to our community. Other regular columns focus on our community, food, Israel, Jewish thought, parenting, teen issues and arts & culture.

Our readership base is in the Philadelphia area, but we are read each month by thousands of subscribers around the world. Our interview of Elie Wiesel was even translated into Portuguese.

Indeed, we have so much material that we strive to bring to you, our readers while the news is still relevant. This is where your support is so helpful. We only have one paid staffer: our webmaster Amir Shoam. He works from Israel and does a great job keeping up with The Philadelphia Jewish Voice during what is for us in Philadelphia the wee hours of the morning.

Dan R Ronit Bonnie Daylin Dan Loeb

Left to right: Dan Rottenberg, author and guest speaker; Ronit Treatman, honoree; Bonnie Squires, president of The Philadelphia Jewish Voice; Senator Daylin Leach, keynote address; and Dan Loeb, founder and publisher of The Philadelphia Jewish Voice. Photo by Helen Loeb.

Tonight we have raised about $12,000 in our 10th anniversary reception. This support will allow the Philadelphia Jewish Voice to continue to provide the level of journalism which we strive for.

Meanwhile, remember that while this reception is a once-in-a-decade celebration, our expenses are an ongoing engagement. Comparable publications get significant ad revenue and ask for $36 per year or more from their readers. We have almost no advertising and provide our content for free. So your continuing generosity is greatly appreciated.

Your feedback and support will fuel us to continue to improve our work as we adventure into a second decade of citizen journalism.

Liz Rogan Mark Aronchick Daylin Leach Ronit Treatman

Left to right: Liz Rogan, president of Lower Merion Board of Commissioners; host Mark Aronchick, Esq.; Senator Daylin Leach, keynote speaker; and honoree Ronit Treatman. Photo by Bonnie Squires.

Philadelphia Jewish Voice Past President Ronit Treatman Honored

Tonight, we gathered not only to mark the anniversary of our paper, but to honor Ronit Treatman, whose role with The Philadelphia Jewish Voice has been critical to our growth and success.

Dan presents menorah to Ronit

Dan Loeb, founder and publisher of The Philadelphia Jewish Voice, presents a silver menorah to immediate past president Ronit Treatman in thanks for her leadership. Photo by Bonnie Squires.

 

Ronit began writing for us in 2009. She soon became a regular contributor to the food column, “The Kosher Table,” which was founded by Lisa Tuttle. Ronit eventually succeeded Lisa as food editor in 2010.

Ronit’s food column allows our readers to meet innovative people who are influencing what we eat and how we consume it. The readers are attracted by delicious food which Ronit and her writers present, but she does not simply present recipes. Instead, the reader is invited to explore culinary trends and ingredients, and the way they are intertwined with Jewish history, geography, and traditions.

Ronit is our guide as we can travel around the world and experience its diverse Jewish communities, and the native flavors found in their regional culinary specialties. She helps us discover our own local farms, artisan purveyors, and restaurants.

Ronit passionately embraces new technology – spearheading the Philadelphia Jewish Voice’s use of social media – and incorporating video in her columns. For example, her video in colonial garb, showing how cholent was prepared in America hundreds of years ago.

Ronit’s writing has an international appeal. In fact, her article on kosher locust attracted attention around the world and landed her an interview on the Public Radio International’s program, “The World”.

Beyond her column, Ronit helps in all aspects of our paper and its leadership. Ronit has just concluded two years as president of The Philadelphia Jewish Voice. She served with her usual thorough, intelligent and insightful approach, helping to build the publication and encourage its volunteers, presiding over a period of growth, innovation and success for The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Treatman family

The Treatman family. Photo by Bonnie Squires.

 

Ronit is a wonderful ambassador for the modern Jewish family and for her love of Israel. She was born in Israel and has lived in Ethiopia and Venezuela before settling in Philadelphia. She graduated from the International School of Caracas, is fluent in five languages and has a B.S. in international business from Temple University.

Ronit’s devotion to The Philadelphia Jewish Voice is typical of her commitment to Israel and the Jewish Community. Ronit served as a volunteer with the Liaison to Foreign Forces Unit of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). She and her husband – the successful lawyer and real estate developer Howard Treatman – are active members of the Germantown Jewish Centre. She is committed to fighting the Boycott, Divest & Sanction movement and anti-Zionist propaganda in our community.

Ronit’s children Devorah, David and Hannah share their parents’ passion for Israel. They have attended Jewish day schools, and Devorah recently completed her service in the IDF. With such role models it is no wonder that the children are carrying on their parents’ commitment to community and leadership.

The Philadelphia Tu B’Shevat Adventure


Orange Tree

— by Ronit Treatman

What do April 15th and the Shevat 15th have in common? Both are tax days! Two thousand years ago, the 15th of Shevat was when the twelve Hebrew tribes paid tithes to the Levites in Jerusalem. Tu B’Shevat, the fifteenth day of the month of Shevat, is described in the Mishnah as the New Year for Trees. During the times of the Temple, fruit tithes would be calculated beginning on Tu B’Shevat. Fruit that grew on trees after the fifteenth day of Shevat was counted for the tithes that were due the following year. These tithes supported the Levites, helped feed the poor, and paid for Tu B’Shevat festivities in Jerusalem.

Following the destruction of the Second Temple by the Romans, the Jews were exiled from Israel, and tithes were no longer paid. The Jews in the Diaspora preserved the memory of Tu B’Shevat by remembering their connection to the Land of Israel. In the Jewish communities of Bukhara, Uzbekistan, and Kurdistan, Tu B’Shevat developed into the “day of eating the seven species.” The seven species are the seven fruits and grains that are listed in the Torah as special products of the Land of Israel. In the 16th century Rabbi Yitzchak Luria, the famous mystic of Safed, and his students collaborated to create the Tu B’Shevat Seder. The observance of Tu B’Shevat has undergone many permutations
since that time.

How can you and your family enjoy this ancient holiday in present day Philadelphia?

Some hands-on ideas to bring your families the warming spirit of Tu B’Shevat this winter follow the jump.


Seven Species

The Longwood Gardens Seven Species Scavenger Hunt

This year, Tu B’Shevat begins on February 7th, at sunset, and extends through the daylight of February 8th. This holiday presents a great opportunity to visit Longwood Gardens. The outdoor gardens will probably be covered with snow, so the half mile long hothouse will be your main destination. The conservatory, built in 1919, resembles a crystal palace. As you step inside, you will be transported to a place where spring has already arrived. The warm air will envelop you. Your family will inhale the aroma of a garden in full bloom, see the beautiful colors of the plants, and hear the rustle of leaves and dripping of water as they explore the greenhouse. It will be fun to look for some of the seven species in the gardens. As is mentioned in Deuteronomy 8:8, the Land of Israel is described as a “land of wheat and barley, of [grape] vines, figs and pomegranates, and a land of olives for oil and [date] honey.” Here is a guide to help you find them.


Olive Tree

Grape Vines

Olives: In Biblical times, olive oil was very important for cooking, as a fuel for lamps, and for preparing soap. There is an olive tree in the Silver Garden.

Grapes: The Estate Fruit House has grape vines. In ancient times in the Land of Israel, grapes were used to make wine and vinegar. The fruit was eaten fresh off the vine. The grape leaves were used in cooking.


Figs at the Vine

Pomegranate Tree

Figs: A fig tree grows in The Estate Fruit House. Figs were eaten fresh, and used in cooking in Biblical Israel. Fig honey and alcohol were made from them.

Pomegranates: A miniature pomegranate tree (with tiny red pomegranates!) may be found in the Bonsai Display. In ancient Israel, pomegranates were used to make wine. Pomegranate juice was used as a dye. They were also a popular snack fresh off the tree.



Dates

Wheat

Barley

Dates: The wild date palm grows in the Palm House. Dates were eaten fresh or dry during Biblical times. They were made into honey. It is thought that when the Land of Israel was described as a “land flowing with milk and honey,” it meant date honey, not bees’ honey.

Wheat and Barley: Wheat was used to bake bread in ancient Israel. It was the staple of the people’s diet. Barley was used to cook porridge and barley cakes. Poor people relied on barley more than on wheat, since it was more plentiful. It was also fed to the cows and goats. Wheat and barley do not grow in the greenhouses of Longwood Gardens! I suggest planning in advance and ordering a bundle of wheat and a bundle of barley from Curious Country Creations.

You can bring these plants with you, and your family may admire them during the visit to Longwood Gardens. Then, the wheat and barley may be part of your Tu B’Shevat Seder decorations!

You can inform yourself about the plants that these fruits of the seven species come from, and admire their beauty at Longwood Gardens. After learning about all these beautiful plants by seeing, smelling, and sometimes touching them, it is time to go home and taste some of them! The way to do that is with a Tu B’Shevat feast!


Tu b’Shvat Seder

The Tu B’Shevat Seder

The first Tu B’Shevat Haggadah was called Pri Etz Hadar” or “Fruit of the Goodly Tree” in Hebrew. It was published in 1753. This Tu B’Shevat Seder was modeled on the Passover Seder. This Seder consisted of a festive meal that celebrated the Kabalistic diagram of the Tree of Life. The original purpose of the Seder was to restore G-d’s blessing by repairing and strengthening the Tree of Life. The traditional concluding blessing of the Tu B’Shevat Seder is “May all the sparks scattered by our hands, or by the hands of our ancestors, or by the sin of the first human against the fruit of the tree, be returned and included in the majestic might of the Tree of Life.” Fruits grown in Israel were served at the Seder and were related to the Four Worlds or “planes of existence” in the Kabbalah. These are Emanation, Creation, Formation, and Action, which are like the roots, trunk, branches, and leaves of a tree. Four cups of wine, symbolizing the four seasons, were also served. Participants read Biblical passages that discussed trees, sang songs about trees and nature, and danced dances inspired by trees. Almonds were important to this Seder because almond trees are the first to blossom in the springtime in Israel. The Kabbalists called this Seder the “Feast of Fruits. Turkish Jews called it “Frutikas Seder,” and referred to Tu B’Shevat as “Frutikas.”  You can follow the first published Tu B’Shevat Seder in your own home.


Almond Tree Blossoms

The Tu B’Shevat Seder was first embraced by the Sephardic Jews, and then by the Ashkenazi Jews. The Ashkenazi Jews developed the custom of eating fifteen different fruits in honor of the “Tu” (15 in Hebrew) in “Tu B’Shevat.” It became a tradition to serve carob, a hardy fruit that could travel well from Israel to Europe. Eating etrog (citron) from Sukkot that was either candied or preserved was another custom that developed. In the late 19th century the Zionist pioneers arrived to cultivate the land of Israel. Israel’s ecology had been harmed by many years of war, extirpation of trees, and desertification. In 1890, Rabbi Zeev Yavetz and his students planted trees in Zichron Yaakov in honor of Tu B’Shevat. The Jewish National Fund adopted this custom to help with the reforestation of Israel. Most recently, Tu B’Shevat has become the Jewish Earth Day. Nature, ecology, and environmentalism are celebrated.

In honor of the Tu B’Shevat Seder, your family may have fun making your home look and feel festive, with a tablecloth, some flowers, and the bunches of wheat and barley on the table. Red and white grape juice should be available. The juice should be served as indicated by the Tu B’Shevat Seder Hagaddah of your choice. Several links to free Hagaddas are provided below.


All of the Tu B’Shevat Hagaddot require the following cups of juice:

  • The First Cup: White grape juice, to symbolize winter.
  • The Second Cup: 2/3 cup white grape juice and 1/3 cup red grape juice, to symbolize a progression to spring.
  • The Third Cup: 1/3 cup white grape juice and 2/3 cup red grape juice, to symbolize spring.
  • The Fourth Cup: Red grape juice, to symbolize summer.

Fifteen types of fruit should be arranged on the table:


Almonds

Autumn Red Peaches
  • Fruit that is hard on the outside and soft on the inside:
    • Pecans
    • Almonds
    • Coconuts
    • Walnuts
       
  • Soft fruit with a pit in the middle:
    • Olives
    • Peaches
    • Cherries
    • Plums
    • Dates
       

    Ripe Carobs

    Fragaria Stawberry
  • Fruits with and inner pit and a tough skin:
    • Avocado
    • Carob
    • Pomegranate
    • Mango
    • Orange
  • Fruit is that which is soft on the inside and outside, and is entirely edible:
    • Grape
    • Fig
    • Strawberry
    • Raisin

You may display a picture of an almond tree in full bloom to learn about the first blossoms of spring in Israel. It is customary to serve a dinner which incorporates fruits and nuts in all of its courses.  Here is a sephardic recipe which includes all seven species.

Sephardic Seven Species Pilaf

  • 1 cup cooked barley
  • 1 cup cooked wheat berries
  • 1/2  cup cut up dried figs
  • 1/2 cup cut up dried dates
  • 1/2 cup sliced grapes
  • 1/4 cup pomegranate juice
  • 1/4 cup vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Mix all the ingredients in a bowl.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Some very good recipes are available at Aish. There are many other recipes that may be found on the Internet. Following are links to some free Tu B’Shevat Seder Haggadahs that are available online. Many more may be found.

Plant A Tree

Following a visit to Longwood Gardens, and a Tu B’Shevat Seder feast, there is an opportunity to plant a seed and nurture a plant. It is too cold in January to plant a tree in Philadelphia. Your family can plant a tree in Israel with the Jewish National Fund. There is a delightful new tradition that you may adopt. You may plant parsley seeds in a pot. Then water ther seeds, give them plant food, and make sure that they are exposed to enough sunlight. If all goes well, in April, you will have a parsley plant that may be used for Karpas (green spring vegetable) in the Passover Seder.

From Seder to Seder, may it be a fruitful year of joyful celebrations!

Celebratory Fall Harvest Soups for Sukkot

–by Ronit Treatman

Other than bread, we are not instructed to serve any specific dishes during Sukkot.  The point of this festival is to celebrate the fall harvest.  A wonderful way to connect to nature is to cook with what is in season locally.  In Pennsylvania we are blessed with a bountiful fall harvest.  Hearty homemade vegetable soups accompanied by an assortment of breads are a wonderful way for your family and guests to warm up during the chilly fall evenings in the sukkah.

You can source your local vegetables by gathering your own crops from your garden, picking vegetables yourself at a farm, being a member of a Community Supported Agriculture group, or shopping at your local farmer’s market, coop, or supermarket.  Fresh seasonal produce will result in the most flavorful soups.  

Soup and bread recipes after the jump.
Some fruits and vegetables that are harvested in Pennsylvania in the fall are broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, lima beans, peppers, pumpkins, and apples.  Here is a recipe for a pareve harvest soup that incorporates some of these fresh vegetables adapted from Casey’s Café.


Spicy Fall Harvest Soup

  • 2 or 3 of any kind of squash such as butternut squash, pumpkin, acorn squash, spaghetti squash, or hubbard.
  • 2 large onions
  • 2 sweet potatoes
  • 2 rutabagas
  • green onions
  • cilantro
  • olive oil
  • salt
  • black pepper
  • 2 cups of vegetable broth
  • 3 cups of coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons fresh grated ginger
  • 1 cup sweet chili sauce
  • 1 tablespoon red Thai curry
  • 2 tablespoons Garam Masala
  • 1 tablespoons Ground coriander
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.  Cut the squash in half.  Remove the seeds and rub the inside with olive oil.  Place on a cookie sheet.
  2. Place the onion, sweet potatoes, rutabags, and turnips in a porcelain baking dish.  Add ½ cup of water, and sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Cover with aluminum foil.
  3. Bake all of these vegetables for 60 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.  Peel the squash.
  4. Puree all the vegetables in a food processor.  
  5. Place the puree in a stockpot with 4 cups of water, the vegetable broth, and coconut milk.
  6. Add ginger, chili sauce, coriander, curry, and garam masala to taste.

You can chop up green onion and cilantro to garnish.

Serve with whole grain corn bread for a gluten-free feast.  Here is a recipe adapted from The Fresh Loaf.

Whole Grain Corn Bread

  • 2 cups ground corn meal
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 egg
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 ¾ cups of soymilk
  • 1 ¾ tablespoons of vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons raw honey
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.  
  2. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl.  
  3. Oil an 8X8 inch porcelain baking dish.  
  4. Pour the batter into the dish.  
  5. Bake for 30 minutes.

Pennsylvania is one of the largest growers of mushrooms in the world.  The rich variety of mushrooms we can get in Kennet Square is not to be overlooked.  Phillips Mushroom Farms grow White, Portobello, Baby Bella, Crimini, Shiitake, Oyster, Maitake, Beech, Enoki, Royal Trumpet, and Pom Pom mushrooms.  Below is an adaptation of Ina Garten’s mushroom soup recipe.


Mushroom Medley Soup

  • 2 cups thinly sliced assorted fresh mushrooms
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 2 leeks, diced
  • 1 cup minced cilantro
  • 1 tablespoon minced thyme
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup white wine
  • salt
  • black pepper
  • ¼ cup flour
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 cup half and half
  1. In a large stockpot, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil.  Sautee the onion, one cup of mushrooms, and carrot.  Season with salt, pepper, and thyme.  When the vegetables have softened, after about 15 minutes, add 6 cups of water.  Bring the mixture to a boil, and then allow to simmer for 30 minutes.
  2. Take another stockpot, and heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil.  Add the leeks.  Let them soften slowly over low heat.  After 20 minutes, add the remaining mushrooms and cook for 10 minutes.  Stir in the flour, and then add the wine.  Pour in the mushroom stock from the other pot and stir.  
  3. Simmer for 15 minutes.  Add the heavy cream and half and half.  Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Serve hot, with a crusty baguette.  Here is a recipe adapted from Food.com


Fresh Baguette

  • 4 1/2 cups unbleached flour
  • 1 packet active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 1/2 cups warm water
  1. Mix water, sugar, and yeast together.  Allow to foam, and then add flour and salt.  Knead well.  Place in an oiled bowl and cover with a kitchen towel.  Allow to rise for 1 1/2 hours.  
  2. Preheat oven to 500 degrees Fahrenheit.  
  3. Form loaf on a cookie sheet.
  4. Prepare an ovenproof bowl with water.
  5. Place cookie sheet with loaf and bowl of water in the oven.
  6. Bake for 30 minutes.

A warming, sweet, cinnamony fall fruit soup is the perfect end to the Sukkah feast.  


You may use freshly harvested Pennsylvania heirloom apples that are good for cooking such as:

  • Red Gravenstein:  An apple variety that was brought to Pennsylvania from Germany in the 1600s.
  • Grimes Golden:  This apple variety is believed to have been planted in West Virginia by Johnny Appleseed in 1795.  
  • Cox Orange Pippin:  This apple was brought from England in the 1830s.  It matures to a beautiful red color, and is excellent for cooking.
  • Calville Blanc:  A French apple grown for King Louis XIII, it has a tart flavor.
  • Newtown Pippin:  This variety was grown for export by Benjamin Franklin in the 1700s.

You can order these apples from #1 Farm, at tug[email protected].  


Fall Fruit Harvest Soup

  • 1 apple, diced
  • 1 pear, diced
  • 1 cup fresh cranberries, diced
  • 3 plums, diced
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • Raw honey to taste (optional)
  1. Place the apple, pear, plums, and cranberries in a pan.  
  2. Cover with water and bring to a boil.  
  3. Add the cinnamon stick.  
  4. Lower the heat and allow to simmer for about 30 minutes.

Stir in honey if desired.  Enjoy hot.

This soup goes well with fresh, hot pumpkin bread.  It is a pareve recipe adapted from Simply Recipes.


Pumpkin Bread

  • 1 cup pureed pumpkin
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup sugar
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon allspice
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 ½ cups unbleached flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ cup chopped walnuts
  • ½ cup roasted pumpkin seeds
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Mix all the ingredients except the roasted pumpkin seeds in a bowl.
  3. Pour into a 9X5X3 inch loaf pan which has been coated with olive oil.  
  4. Decorate the top with roasted pumpkin seeds.
  5. Bake for 60 minutes.

As the fall days grow shorter and cooler, the yearly ritual is upon us.  We celebrate the fall harvest together in our sukkot.  Whether you are hosting or visiting, offering a delicious, homemade warming soup and a fresh loaf of fragrant bread is the perfect way to bond with friends and family.