Blood Orange Salad Sicilian-Style

It is the end of the orange growing season in Israel. The blood oranges are the last to ripen. Their deep vermillion hues are like the final brushstrokes of the setting winter sun. One of the best ways to feature this tangy citrus fruit is in a Sicilian salad, which marries the flavors of winter oranges with new spring herbs.

Photo by Erich Ferdinand https://www.flickr.com/photos/erix/

Photo by Erich Ferdinand

Blood Orange Salad Sicilian-Style
Adapted from Tasting Sicily

Ingredients:

  • 4 blood oranges
  • Parsley
  • Green onion
  • Anchovy filet
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Salt
  • Black pepper
  1. Peel and cut up the blood oranges.
  2. Chop up the green onion and parsley.
  3. Mash the anchovy filet.
  4. Mix everything together in a large bowl.
  5. Season to taste with salt, black pepper, and olive oil.

“The Modern Kosher Kitchen” by Ronnie Fein

Recipes in The Modern Kosher Kitchen Book-Kosher-Kitchenby Ronnie Fein offer gourmet training wheels for the aspiring Kosher cook. In our lifetime a revolution has taken place in Kosher recipe books and cooking. The bland kosher recipe books on the shelves of all-too-many Ashkenazi parents and grandparents were also problematic due to high fat and sugar content.

For those unaccustomed to the pedal-to-the-metal spice revolution of our times, The Modern Kosher Kitchen offers opportunities to explore creative contemporary additions such as Siriracha sauce (a chili sauce named after the coastal city of Si Racha, in Chonburi Province of eastern Thailand), that helps kosher cooks to bridge the bland/sweet divide.

For example: White Bean and Vegetable Hurry-Up Salad

  • 1 can (15 oz or 425 g) white beans
  • 3 medium carrots, sliced thin
  • 1 ripe avocado, peeled and chopped
  • 1 cup (130 g) frozen peas, thawed
  • 1/2 cup (80 g) chopped red onion
  • 1/4 cup (15 g) chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/4 cup (24 g) chopped fresh mint
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/3 cup (60 ml) olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) lemon juice
  • Salt, to taste

Rinse the white beans under cold running water; let drain and place them in a bowl. Add the carrots, avocado, peas, onion, parsley, mint, cumin, and cayenne pepper and toss to distribute the ingredients evenly.

Pour in the olive oil and lemon juice. Toss again to coat the ingredients. Taste for seasoning and add salt to taste. Let rest for about 15 minutes before serving.

Yield: 6 servings

Serving Suggestions and Variations: Use chickpeas or black beans instead of white beans; use any cooked chopped green vegetable (such as broccoli, green string beans, thawed frozen lima beans, or edamame) instead of peas.

And secure many happy dining comments at your meal by making halibut or salmon on the grill and serving atop:

Spicy Marinated Pineapple

  • 1 whole pineapple
  • 3 tablespoons (60 g) honey
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon (15 g) siriracha
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) lime juice
  • Kosher salt or Maldon sea salt
  • Mint, for garnish

Cut the leaves off the pineapple. Remove the outer fibrous rind. Cut the peeled pineapple in slices about 3/4-inch (1.9 cm) thick. Set aside in a single layer in a pan. Heat the honey with the vegetable oil and siriracha in a saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the ingredients are well mixed. Add the time juice. Pour over the pineapple slices. Coat the pineapples slices on both sides and let marinate at least 1 hour (and as long as 12 hours). Preheat an outdoor grill to medium (or use a grill pan or the oven broiler.) Grill the slices for about 4 minutes per side or until well glazed and tender, brushing occasionally with some of the honey mixture. Serve sprinkled lightly with salt. Garnish with fresh mint. You can make these ahead and refrigerate. Serve at room temperature or reheat to warm in a pre-heated 350°F (190°C, or gas mark 4) oven for a few minutes.

Yield: 4-6 servings.

Serving Suggestions and Variations: Grilled, speed pineapple lens monumental flavor to mild main-course foods such as fish and chicken.

Your family and guests will delight in the evolution of Kosher cuisine, combined, as has been the case throughout Jewish history, with the elements of the cultures among which Jewish people dwell. I bought our sriracha sauce at an International Market while visiting family who live in Passaic and it’s available on line, too. The Modern Kosher Kitchen by Ronnie Fein definitely and deftly adds spice to life!

Black Lentil and Nectarine Salad

Photo by Jeremy Keith https://www.flickr.com/photos/adactio/

Photo by Jeremy Keith.

The heavy dishes and red wines of winter have been set aside. Summer is here, and it is time to enjoy three months of lighter meals.

My wife and I held a get-together for our village to celebrate the season and create a delicious salad together. Our main components were black lentils and fresh herbs.

Black Lentil and Nectarine Salad

  • 2 cups black lentilsIMG-20150516-WA0024
  • 1 cup chopped dill
  • 1 cup chopped parsley
  • 1/4 cup chopped mint leaves
  • 2 large nectarines, cubed
  • salt to taste
  • 2 lemons, juiced
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  1. Place the black lentils in a saucepan.
  2. Cover with water.
  3. Bring to a boil, and simmer for 15 minutes.
  4. Drain the lentils in a colander under cold running water.
  5. Place the lentils in a large bowl.
  6. Combine with all the other ingredients.

Green Passover Salad


Green Salad by Marisa McClellan.
© Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

— by Abby Contract

After many months of gloomy weather and eating winter offerings of potatoes and cabbage, I am ready to welcome my spring crop of fresh herbs.  I am especially excited to see the first shoots of dill.  Dill originated in Eastern Europe, and has a high tolerance for cold weather.  This healthy, aromatic herb is high in iron, calcium, and fiber.  It is a very popular addition to salads in Eastern Europe.

For the first Seder dinner, I’ll include the dill in an amazingly refreshing Spring Green Salad which combats the heaviness of brisket, potato kugel and the multiple pieces of matzoh. I’ve made this salad, which has the right balance of crunch and tanginess, for years. It reminds me of a good friend who happens to always be open to new experiences, encouraging others to join in on the fun. And, that’s what Passover should be about – a surprising and ever-changing blend of history, tradition, novelty, openness and joy.

Recipe follows the jump.
Spring Green Salad
Serves 6

  • 16 cups of washed and torn romaine lettuce
  • 1 English cucumber, julienned
  • 4 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup of minced fresh dill
  • 1/2 cup of olive oil
  • 6 tablespoon of fresh lemon juice
  • 2 garlic cloves pressed
  1. Combine lettuce, cucumbers, green onions, and dill in large bowl.
  2. Whisk olive oil, lemon juice, and garlic in small bowl until blended. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Pour dressing over salad. Toss until evenly coated and serve. Enjoy!

Abby Contract is the creator of Phoodistory, a celebration of Philly’s fanatical history with food.

Colorful Couscous Salad

— by Ronit Treatman

Brighten up your table this winter with a hearty couscous salad, filled with chopped vegetables, dry apricots, and fresh cranberries.  The dressing is an exotic Israeli combination of tahini and silan (date honey).  

Recipe follows the jump.
Colorful Couscous Salad

For the salad:

  • 2 cups steamed couscous
  • 2 tomatoes, diced
  • Bunch of scallions, sliced
  • Bunch of cilantro, minced
  • 3 tablespoons of fresh cranberries
  • 4 dried apricots, diced

For the dressing:

  • 2 tablespoons raw tahini
  • 2 tablespoons Galil Silan Date “Honey”
  • 1/2 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • Juice from 1 lemon
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Place the ingredients for the dressing in a glass jar.  Seal tightly and shake well.

Mix the vegetables and couscous in a bowl.
Pour the dressing over the salad.

Mango-Avocado Salad

— by Challah Maidel

There are many ways to keep cool in the summer, and a refreshing salad does it for me as just well as ice cream, cold soup and swimming. This mango-avocado salad recipe was originally borrowed from “Reader’s Digest,” many issues ago. This is a good salad to enjoy now that fresh mangoes and avocado are in the market. I recreated this recipe at a family barbecue and the only complaints I received were that I didn’t make enough for everyone. At events where the meals are heavy in protein, salad is always a nice balance, and even some coniferous meat-eaters can agree with that. I recommend Serving this salad along with grilled chicken.

The ingredients of this salad, except for avocado and mango, include tomatoes, red onions and lime vinaigrette. These ingredients induce an interesting flavor of spicy, sweet and sour.

Full recipe after the jump.
Mango Avocado Salad (Yields 4 servings.)

  • 1 large ripe mango peel, removed and cubed
  • 2 ripe Haas avocados, cubed
  • 4-5 tomatoes, diced
  • 1 red onion, diced
  • 4 tbsp fresh lime juice (you can use lemon juice as well)
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro, or parsley
  1. Place all the chopped vegetables in a salad bowl.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk lime juice, olive oil, and balsamic vinegar.
  3. Lightly toss into a salad.
  4. Top with chopped cilantro or parsley and serve.

Challah Maidel is a blog about healthy kosher eating.  

A Fabulous Feast

— by Dakota Marine

This past Friday I had the opportunity to do something very special on campus. A couple of friends in my sorority house asked if I was interested in helping to cook a dinner for the organization Aish on campus. The normal hosts of Aish were out of town, but they still wanted to provide students with the weekly Friday night Shabbat dinner, so they needed help from us, the active members of Aish.

We arrived at the house at 1 and instantly jumped into Challah preparation — the hefty bag of Spelt (non-wheat) Flour was carried up from the downstairs and lifted onto the counter, along with the other ingredients. We cracked eggs, poured Spelt flour, dripped honey, sprinkled salt, scooped dry yeast, drizzled vegetable oil and began to mix the ingredients in a large bowl. After kneading the Challah with our hands, we let it sit for about 2 hours so it had time to rise. Next, came the “Thai Slaw” salad.

Making the salads after the jump.
This is one of my favorite salads because of the sweet and salty tastes from the dressing combined with the crunchiness of the cabbage, cucumbers and leaves of Cilantro. The rainbow array of cabbage was placed on the bottom of a large purple bowl, it was used as a base for the remainder of the salad. Then we chopped up long green English Cucumbers and tossed them into the mix of cabbage. I sneakily munched on the leftover pieces of Cucumber while no one was looking. Then it was time for dressing preparation: Olive Oil, Rice Wine Vinegar, Soy Sauce and Sesame seeds. Then I slowly drizzled the dressing over the salad. In an effort to spread it out throughout the entire bowl, I took the large salad tongs and scooped the cabbage from the bottom up, so every last piece was dressed.

For a crowd pleaser salad, we decided on a corn, avocado and tomato salad. About 20 miniature cobbs of corn were lined up in a tin-foil container and placed in the oven to defrost. As the corn was softening in the oven, I took on the liberty of slicing the tomatoes. Tomatoes are a difficult vegetable to cut and I struggled a bit as the juice poured out from the inside. After the four tomatoes were cut, the corn was taken out of the oven. I cut the kernels off the ears of corn and spooned both the tomatoes and corn into the large container. And it was time for the last ingredient… avocado! The brown and green circular vegetables were sliced in half and cut into small chunks for the salad. The bright yellow, red and green colors of the vegetables made the salad a sight to see. The salad was covered in a lime juice, salt and pepper dressing with a drop of olive oil.

Although it was a tiring day, the long hours of preparation were worth every second. I love to cook and this was the perfect opportunity.

Dakota Marine is the creator of Eat My Tailgate, where she takes us into her sorority’s kitchen.

Winter Soup And Salad

— by Talia Goren

In these cold January days, what can be better than soup and salad? Try the delicious combination of mushroom-quinoa soup and heart of palm salad. It is gluten, dairy, meat and soy free!

Full recipe and picture after the jump.

Mushroom and Quinoa Soup

  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 3 cups water
  • 1lb sliced mushrooms, cut in half or thirds
  • 2 cups raw quinoa
  • 3 shallots, sliced
  • 2 tsp fresh ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp fresh ground white pepper
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 2 tsp garlic powder
  • 3 cloves minced garlic
  • Salt to taste
  1. Put vegetable broth and water in the pot on medium heat for 5-6 minutes.
  2. Add spices, stirring in between each addition and let simmer for another 5-6 minutes.
  3. Add mushrooms and shallots.
  4. Once it’s boiling, add quinoa and minced garlic. Simmer on low for 15-25 minutes, or until quinoa is cooked through.
  5. Serve with freshly ground black pepper!

Hearts of Palm Salad with Dill Dijon Dressing

For the salad:

  • 2 medium plum tomatoes
  • 2 parisian (or equally small) cucumbers
  • 1/2 white onion
  • 6 hearts of palm (if they are short. if they are long, you only need three). Note: make sure there isn’t extra salt or flavoring, you won’t need it!
  • 1 bunch romaine lettuce
  1. Chop tomatoes, cucumbers and onions into small squares.
  2. Slice hearts of palm (about 2cm each), and then in half.
  3. Separate lettuce and then slice into 2 inch pieces.
  4. Toss gently.

For the dressing:

  • 1 Tbsp Gluten Free Dijon Mustard
  • 2 Tbsp Red Wine Vinegar
  • 3 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  1. Combine all ingredients until mustard has incorporated into the olive oil.
  2. Drizzle on the salad, tossing well so it’s fully covered.
  3. Enjoy!

Talia spends a lot of her time in the kitchen preparing copious amounts of experimental foods, which she tests on her very patient and consequently well-fed family and friends. Although she came to the states from Israel when she was just a toddler, she retains her love of loud, passionate discussions and homemade hummus. When she is not in “balabuste” mode, she makes a living composing, singing and performing. Talia also gives workshops to young singers to teach them healthy vocal, performance and audition technique.

Buckwheat Salad

— by Challah Maidel

Despite its name, buckwheat is not wheat. It’s gluten-free, and it’s safe for people with celiac disease. Buckwheat and wheat are from completely different botanical families. Buckwheat seeds are technically the fruit of a plant called Fagopyrum esculentum. Although buckwheat is not a grain, it is sometimes referred to as a pseudocereal. For processing into food, buckwheat seeds must first be dehulled. The remaining seed material, called groats, can be ground into flour. Roasted groats are known as kasha. Buckwheat is high in protein and B vitamins and rich in phosphorus, potassium, iron, calcium, and lysine. A great source of dietary fiber, buckwheat helps lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

The full recipe after the jump.
Growing up, I remember my grandmother serving buckwheat as a hot side dish along with some whole wheat farfalle (bow tie pasta). Ironically, buckwheat wasn’t exactly on the top of my favorite dishes until I’ve learned about other variations. A lot of people I know tend to serve buckwheat as a side dish, which is fine. I’ve seen buckwheat being eaten as it is. Some people I know would also add some tomato sauce and cheese, or ground beef.

I know that I’m long overdue for a salad recipe. I do think buckwheat would make a great and nutritious addition to salads. I’m sure a lot of you discovered a variety of buckwheat salad recipes. I initially planned to make a buckwheat salad using apples,walnuts, and cinnamon. Instead, I’ve decided to make this salad more savory at the last minute. This salad can be eaten hot or cold. You can use produce outside  of which I provide on this recipe. I don’t like abiding by the letter of the law when it comes to cooking. That is why I tend to create my own variation.

  • 2 cup of buckwheat
  • 1 lemon zested and juiced
  • 1 medium red onion chopped
  • 2 medium carrots peeled and diced
  • 3 plum tomatoes chopped and seeded
  • 1 large ripe avocado pitted and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons of balsamic vinegar
  • 1 clove of garlic minced
  • 1/4 cup of olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon of chopped fresh basil
  • 1 teaspoon of paprika
  • Pinch of salt and pepper
  • Handful of chopped parsley
  1. Add 4 cups water for every 2 cups buckwheat. Sprinkle a bit of sea salt in the water,
  2. bring it to a boil for a couple of minutes, then turn down to low and simmer for 15 minutes. Buckwheat is fully cooked when it is dry and fluffy. Do not stir the buckwheat while it is cooking.
  3. Mix together the dressing by whisking the lemon zest and juice, balsamic vinegar, garlic, basil,paprika, oil, salt, and pepper. The pinch salt will bring the oil and vinegar together. Add vegetables to the dressing bowl and toss.
  4. Once the buckwheat is cooked, add it to the bowl. Add parsley, give it one last toss, and serve.

Yields 4 servings.

Challah Maidel is a celebration of Kosher healthy eating.