Dayenu – A Call to Action

Dayenu!

Nachshon

Waves symbolizing the waters of the Red Sea.

“It would have been enough for us.”

This is our response to each of the many miracles we enumerate at the Seder table. Thank you, God, for doing each of these great things; if you stopped at any point along the way, that should have been enough to satisfy us.

But our response is incomplete.

[Read more…]

Immigration Hagaddah Supplement From HIAS

Photos from the HIAS Haggadah

Photos from the HIAS Haggadah.

This year, above all others, we should turn our thoughts and deeds to the millions of refugees fleeing from war and violence, a reincarnation of our great-grandparents fleeing from pogroms, conscription into the army of the czar and abject poverty. HIAS, our agency for resettlement of refugees in the United States, has prepared a Hagaddah supplement with striking photos and drawings of what it means to be a refugee today.

The full 10-page booklet is available for free use. Here is just an excerpt: [Read more…]

Gratz College Exhibit: Perfect Precursor to Passover

The Tuttleman Library at Gratz College is hosting an exhibit of historic Haggadot. The Haggadot were created through the centuries, in many languages and under a wide range of circumstances. Some were created from memory — during wars, in ghettos, on kibbutzim.

The highlight of the exhibit is a presentation by Dr. Ierachmiel (Yerach) Daskal. Dr. Daskal is a pathologist with an M.D. and a Ph.D. — and a passion for collecting historic Haggadot. He will share several originals that he has chosen from his own personal collection of over 800 samples.

For more information, contact Hope Matles (215-635-7300, x172). To register, complete the online form.

Refreshments will be served at this event. Admission is free, but a small donation to the library would be greatly appreciated.

Archbishop Sends Passover Greetings

Archbishop Chaput.

Archbishop Chaput.

Dear Friends,

Now that the annual observance of Passover is drawing near, I take this opportunity to send greetings to the Jewish community in the Philadelphia area. Both on my own, and in union with the clergy and laity of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, I offer my prayerful best wishes on this holy occasion.

We live in a time when global issues like war and persecution have resulted in many newcomers in our midst.  They are often made to feel very alienated.  The experience of the people of the Exodus has something very timely for us to learn.  They were urged to be just and kind to the stranger. We must apply this teaching to our day with greater devotion than ever. [Read more…]

Tunisian Passover Fourma

IMG_0002One of the staples of the Tunisian table is the fourma, or molded noodle dish. Cooked noodles are mixed with spiced meat or vegetables. Eggs are beaten and used to bind the noodle mixture. The casserole is baked and served at any meal, hot or cold. The Jews of Tunisia have a special fourma recipe that they prepare for Passover.

Tunisian Jews eat kitniyot (grains and legumes) during Passover. The starch in the Passover fourma is rice, which has been carefully picked over and cleaned to make sure that there is no chametz in it. Those of you who don’t eat kitniyot during Passover may substitute the rice in the recipe for boiled, diced potatoes or matza farfel.

IMG_0007Passover Fourma
Adapted from Laurent

  • 1 cup cooked brown rice
  • 1 Lb. ground beef
  • 1 large onion, minced
  • 1 cup marinara sauce
  • 4 eggs, whisked
  • 1 bunch parsley, minced
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • Salt
  • Black pepper
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a heavy skillet.
  3. Brown the onion.
  4. Add the ground beef.
  5. Season with ground cinnamon, salt, and pepper.
  6. Mix in the parsley.
  7. Set aside and allow to cool.
  8. In a large bowl mix the rice, marinara sauce, meat, and eggs.
  9. Pour the mixture into an oiled casserole dish.
  10. Bake for about 45 minutes.
  11. Serve with harissa and a crispy green salad.

Raise Your “Goblet of Fire” to “The Hogwarts Haggadah”

If you think your Passover Seder is missing that magic touch, perhaps Harry Potter and his friends can help you out. Moshe Rosenberg, author of Morality for Muggles: Ethics in the Bible and the World of Harry Potter, recently published his latest Jewish-Potter hybrid project, The (Unofficial) Hogwarts Haggadah.

For the kids (and let’s be honest, adults), who are fast asleep before you can finally eat at the Seder, The (Unofficial) Hogwarts Haggadah will be the spell that breaks the boredom curse. First, the Haggadah itself is aesthetically pleasing with Harry Potter and Passover illustrations, designed by Aviva Shur, that will keep the wondering eye on the page. In regards to the text, the Haggadah has a traditional layout so it can be used in lieu of your non-wizard copy. Rosenberg periodically stops the Passover story with quick nuggets of Jewish thoughts that are grounded in Talmud, Midrash and Kabbalah. But right when you think you may be growing tired, he shifts to Harry Potter and how the J.K. Rowling series relates to the biblical story. [Read more…]

Passover Seder & Dinner

Congregation Hesed Shel Emet will host a Passover Seder and Dinner on Friday, April 22, 2016 at 6:30 pm.  This event is open to the public and people of all faiths are encouraged and welcome to attend.

Please purchase tickets before April 17, 2016.

Adults – $25; Kids (5-13) – $18; (under 5) – $5.00  (a nominal fee will be added at checkout.)

 

Technion Produces 2-Minute “High-Tech Hagaddah”

With lights, music and very few words, Israel’s Technion university has produced a two-minute “high-tech Hagaddah.”

The video uses breakdancing by Dvir Rosen, motion graphics, and an innovative laser light show. It is participating in the New Jersey Jewish Standard’s funniest Passover video contest.

Last year, the Technion built a seder Rube Goldberg machine.

Book Review: “The Exodus You Almost Passed Over”

Pesach

Passover table

Why is Rabbi David Fohrman’s new book, The Exodus You Almost Passed Over, different from all other books? The answer is that the Haggadah’s account you learned, first as a child and then repeated as an adult, is not the whole story.

Rabbi Fohrman concedes that the Exodus narrative in the Haggadah may hold one’s interest the first few times read but over time you probably would have preferred the CliffsNotes version so as to get to the food sooner.

However if you learned nothing else during the annual reading of the Haggadah, and the ensuing discussions, it should come as no surprise that there were two biblical Pharaohs, one good — and one not so good. Joseph’s Pharaoh was good. Moses’ Pharaoh was bad. But that’s not where the story ends; in fact, that is where the hidden Exodus story begins.

Fohrman an Orthodox scholar, takes us on a journey full of unexpected twists and turns driven by his respectful exegesis of biblical texts and commentaries. He explores the passages in the Torah that the Haggadah is based on. For example, did you know that Israelites went out from Egypt, with Pharaoh’s permission, hundreds of years before the Exodus? (Genesis 50) Really, how could we have missed that? He calls the first exodus the Phantom Exodus because it has heretofore been hidden from view, since it isn’t featured in the Haggadah. In it, the key players are not Moses, Aaron and the Pharaoh of Moses, but rather those who preceded them, namely Jacob, Joseph and Joseph’s Pharaoh. He draws out amazing parallels between the two events, which shed light on their deeper meaning, God’s plans for the Israelites and for us, their descendants. [Read more…]

Freedom and Kitniyot For All!

Photo by By CSIRO, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=35476067

Photo: Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization

In 1989 the Law Committee of the Rabbinical Assembly of Israel issued a responsum to the question Ashkenazi Jews ask every Passover: “Why are we not permitted to eat kitniyot (legumes), while Sephardic Jews are?” The Rabbinical Assembly concluded that this is a “mistaken custom” and that Ashkenazi Jews are permitted to consume kitniyot as well. This responsum technically only applies to people living in Israel. Ashkenazi Jews who live elsewhere, will need to clear this with their own rabbi if they would also like to change their family’s custom. Also this Passover season for the first time the Conservative movement has authorized Ashkenazi Jews to eat kitniyot.

If we go back to the source, the Torah has the following to say about chametz: First, we are told not to eat unleavened bread during the seven days of Passover, and to remove all leavened bread from our homes. Jews living in the diaspora added an additional day to make sure they complied with the observance of Passover on the right days of the Hebrew Calendar.

Seven days shall ye eat unleavened bread; howbeit the first day ye shall put away leaven out of your houses; for whosoever eateth leavened bread from the first day until the seventh day, that soul shall be cut off from Israel. (Exodus 12:15).

Then the Torah instructs us not to have any leavened bread on our property or temporary place of residence during the seven (or eight in the diaspora) days of Passover.

Seven days shall there be no leaven found in your houses; for whosoever eateth that which is leavened, that soul shall be cut off from the congregation of Israel, whether he be a sojourner, or one that is born in the land.

The significance of Passover is summarized by Moses in Exodus 13:3:

And Moses said unto the people: ‘Remember this day, in which ye came out from Egypt, out of the house of bondage; for by strength of hand the LORD brought you out from this place; there shall no leavened bread be eaten.’

The rabbis who wrote the Mishnah (10-220 CE) ruled that five types of grain were permitted for baking matzah. These are wheat, barley, spelt, rye, and oats. When these grains are mixed with water they ferment very quickly. They instructed that the dough must be mixed and baked in eighteen minutes or the matzah would not be considered “unleavened bread.” When analyzing rice and sesame seeds, these rabbis noted that when these were combined with water, they decayed, they did not ferment. Therefore, they were not considered chametz.

In the thirteenth century, the rabbis of Provence prohibited the consumption of rice and kitniyot during Passover. This custom spread throughout Europe. No clear reason for this new prohibition was ever provided. Some rabbis in other cities objected to this ruling, saying that it was a mistaken custom, a foolish custom, and an unnecessary stringency.

The question facing the rabbis today is, may they change a mistaken custom? They concluded that they may and they must. Doing away with this custom will return the focus of Passover to the original intent of the Torah. It will enhance the enjoyment of Passover by offering a greater variety of foods. The new ruling will make the celebration more affordable. One of the best results of this initiative is that it will lessen friction between the Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews, who will finally be able to enjoy the same foods together at the Seder.

I am an “Ashkefardic” Jew, from a “mixed” family. The Passover battles of my grandparent’s generation are legendary. The preparations for the Seder always started with a fight, which wasn’t even about the relatives. The topic was the same every year: rice or potatoes. The end result was a lose-lose truce, neither rice nor potatoes. Matzah was the only starch served during the festive meal.

Thanks to this new ruling, there may be more shalom bayit, or peace in the home. Some of the kitniyot permitted by the Sephardic Passover Guide are “Anise, Beans, Black Eyed Peas, Buckwheat, Canola Oil, Caraway, Chickpeas, Confectioners’ sugar with corn starch, Coriander, Corn, Corn Syrup, Cumin, Fennel, Fenugreek, Flax Seeds, Hemp, Kasha, Lentils, Licorice, Millet, Mustard, Peanuts, Popcorn, Poppy Seeds, Rice, Sesame Seeds, Snow Peas, Soy Oil, Corn Oil, Soy, String Beans, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu (from soy).”

This is a wonderful development for vegetarians and vegans. For the uninitiated, here are some of the most beloved recipes with kitniyot for Passover.

In the Jewish communities of Sicily, Egypt, Turkey, and Greece fava beans ripened just as Passover was celebrated. It was traditional to include a dish with fava beans at the Seder.

Photo by boo lee

Photo by boo lee

Braised Artichokes with Fava Beans (Anjinara con Aves)
Adapted from The Sephardic Kitchen by Rabbi Robert Sternberg

  • 8 artichokes
  • 1 pound fava beans
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 4 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh dill, minced
  • Salt
  • Black pepper
  1. Place all the ingredients except the salt, pepper, and fresh dill in a large pot.
  2. Bring to a boil, and then reduce the heat to a simmer.
  3. Cover the pot and cook for 45 minutes.
  4. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and dill.

The Syrian Jewish community has a beautiful rice dish reserved for special occasions such as the Passover Seder. This dish is famous for the beautiful golden hue and rich aroma extracted from the saffron it is spiced with.

Saffron Rice (Riz w’Zafran)
Adapted from Aromas of Aleppo by Poopa Dweck

  • 1 cup white rice
  • 3 saffron threads
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • Pinch of ground cardamom
  • 1/2 cup toasted almond, pine nuts, or pistachios
  1. Heat the olive oil in a heavy pot.
  2. Add the onion, and sauté over medium heat until translucent.
  3. Pour 1 1/2 cups of cold water into the pot.
  4. Bring to a boil.
  5. Season with the saffron, cinnamon stick, salt, and cardamom.
  6. Add the rice and bring back to a boil.
  7. Lower the heat and allow to simmer for 30 minutes.
  8. Sprinkle with the toasted nuts when ready to serve.