Who Is Committing Voter Fraud These Days

Voter ID is a solution to a non-existent problem. Pretending to be someone else, going to the polling place where anyone might recognize you, and voting has high risk for low rewards. The perpetrator will probably go to jail and for what: the possibility of gaining a single vote.

However, voter fraud does exist. Here is what has been going on and who was responsible.

Fill in the blanks: Ballot Tampering by Oregon Republicans

(Willamette Week) A Clackamas County elections worker is under criminal investigation for tampering with ballots, WW has learned.

The underlying allegation is that the woman, whose name has not been released, filled in blanks on ballots turned into the county for the Nov. 6 general election.

Sources familiar with the incident say their understanding is that the woman filled in a straight Republican ticket on the ballots where preferences had been left blank by voters.


Taking out the trash: Discarding Dem. Voter Registration Forms

(TPM) A Pennsylvania man employed by a company working for the Republican Party of Virginia was arrested by investigators from the Rockingham County Sheriff’s office on Thursday and charged with destroying voter registration forms.

Colin Small, a 23-year-old resident of Phoenixville, Pa., worked for Pinpoint, a company hired to register voters on behalf of the Republican Party of Virginia. Prosecutors charged him with four counts of destruction of voter registration applications, eight counts of failing to disclose voter registration applications and one count of obstruction of justice.

Leading Them Astray: Sending Dems to wrong polling place.

(TPM) Democratic officials in Arizona asked federal and state authorities late Sunday to investigate robocalls from Republican Jeff Flake’s Senate campaign that told registered Democrats to vote at the wrong polling locations.

Brahm Resnik of Phoenix television station KPNX first reported on the calls on Sunday, interviewing a Democrat named Mary Crecco and at least six other Democratic voters who received them. Crecco said she believed she was purposefully told to go to the wrong polling location miles away from the correct one because she is a Democrat.

Mitt Said He Would Shut Down FEMA

Exchange from CNN’s June GOP Primary Debate

CNN Moderator John King: What else, Governor Romney? You’ve been a chief executive of a state. I was just in Joplin, Missouri. I’ve been in Mississippi and Louisiana and Tennessee and other communities dealing with whether it’s the tornadoes, the flooding, and worse. FEMA is about to run out of money, and there are some people who say do it on a case-by-case basis and some people who say, you know, maybe we’re learning a lesson here that the states should take on more of this role. How do you deal with something like that?

Governor Mitt Romney: Absolutely. Every time you have an occasion to take something from the federal government and send it back to the states, that’s the right direction. And if you can go even further and send it back to the private sector, that’s even better.

Instead of thinking in the federal budget, what we should cut — we should ask ourselves the opposite question. What should we keep? We should take all of what we’re doing at the federal level and say, what are the things we’re doing that we don’t have to do? And those things we’ve got to stop doing, because we’re borrowing $1.6 trillion more this year than we’re taking in. We cannot…

King: Including disaster relief, though?

Romney: We cannot — we cannot afford to do those things without jeopardizing the future for our kids. It is simply immoral, in my view, for us to continue to rack up larger and larger debts and pass them on to our kids, knowing full well that we’ll all be dead and gone before it’s paid off. It makes no sense at all.

Follow up

Yesterday, after a storm relief event campaign rally in Ohio, Mitt Romney refused to answer questions about how he would handle the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). According to the Romney pool report,

TV pool asked Romney at least five times whether he would eliminate FEMA as president/what he would do with FEMA. He ignored the q[uestions]s but they are audible on cam[era]. The music stopped at points and the q[uestions]s would have been audible to him.

Academy of Music 155th Anniversary Concert and Ball


Major movers and shakers in Philadelphia’s economy were among the 1500 supporters at Saturday night’s 155th Anniversary Academy of Music Concert and Ball, including (left to right) Ron and Rachelle Kaiserman, Robert and Caroline Zuritsky, and Renee and Joe Zuritsky.

— by Bonnie Squires

Philadelphia’s premier white-tie event took place at the historic Academy of Music, preceded by receptions and dinner at the Park Hyatt at the Bellevue.

The Philadelphia Orchestra’s 155th Academy of Music Anniversary Concert and Ball featured the debut on the Academy of Music stage of. Music Director Designate Yannick Nézet-Séguin , with special guests multiple Grammy Award®-winners singer/pianist Diana Krall and cellist Yo-Yo Ma. Tipping its hat once again to the first Academy concert, the program was a mix of popular and classical music, just as the 1857 opening concert was.

Jazz performer Krall surprised the audience by calling back on stage her friend and collaborator, Yo-Yo Ma, to the delight of everyone.

More after the jump.


Terese Casey, wife of Senator Bob Casey, and Felice Wiener

Yannick also had the Philadanco dancers, reflecting the rainbow of colores which lit the stage and columns of the Academy, perform to the strains of the orchestra.  A surprise finish was the appearance of the Society Hill Dancers, dressed in formal attire of the 1850s, doing a waltz.

The Jewish community was among 1500 supporters of the Philadelphia Orchestra and the Academy of Music, an historic monument to music, opera and dance. The Gala evening began with a pre-concert dinner. Guests could choose from two exciting offerings this year: the President’s Cocktail Party and Dinner at the Park Hyatt at the Bellevue, or a Dine Around option, which allows patrons to dine at selected restaurants along the Avenue of the Arts, or on their own. In a nod to the Academy’s early years, and in a unique departure from recent history, both the Anniversary Concert and the Academy Ball were held entirely within the Academy of Music. A “symphony in three movements,” this unique evening gave attendees the chance to celebrate the “Grand Old Lady of Locust Street” within her very walls.

Public officials attending the evening included Governor and Mrs. Tom Corbett, Senator and Mrs. Bob Casey, a number of city and state officials, and corporate, cultural, arts organizations and philanthropic foundation leaders.


Christina and John Saler

The gala was co-chaired by Joanna McNeil Lewis, president and CEO of the Academy of Music,  and John R. Saler, chairman of Stradley and Ronon’s Government Affairs Practice Group, who also serves on the board of the Philadelphia Orchestra.


Corbetts greet Richard Worley, chairman of the Philadelphia Orchestra, with Joanna McNeil Lewis and John Saler, co-chairs of the Academy of Music Concert and Ball, in the background.

In the receiving line with the co-chairs and the Corbetts were Richard Worley, chairman of the Philadelphia Orchestra board of trustees, and Allison Vulgamore, CEO of the Orchestra.

The energy of Yannick, the Orchestra, the guest artists and the dancers enthralled the audience.  And the impressive program journal, reflecting the support of various segments of the community, was the parting gift as people finally left the Academy balls, held in various sections of the Grand Old Lady of Broad Street.

Photos credit: Bonnie Squires.


More photos
David and Susan Lipson Ken and Nancy Davis Ron and Marcia RubinHelen and David Pudlin, Esq.
Sandy and David Marshall, with Dianne and Jeff Rotwitt Scott and Lynne Mason with friends Pat and Rob Schaffer Harmelin Group

Academy of Music Concert and Ball

Marc Rayfield, head of CBS Radio in Philly, and his wife Nicole, joined friends Haley and David Adelman at the President's Reception in the Academy Ballroom.

Marc Rayfield, head of CBS Radio in Philly, and his wife Nicole, joined friends Haley and David Adelman at the President’s Reception in the Academy Ballroom.

— Bonnie Squires

The 154th Anniversary Academy of Music Concert and Ball on Saturday night, January 29, 2011, was supported by many members of the area’s Jewish community.  A list of the major sponsors, plus a bird’s-eye view of participants, highlighted the important role which the Jewish community plays in the cultural life of Philadelphia and the region.

Photos of these community leaders follow the jump.
Linda Scribner and her husband David Paskin, M.D., were the first in the Academy of Music Ballroom, as Linda, as director of the Academy of Music, seems to be in charge of everything that night.
Linda Scribner and her husband David Paskin, M.D., were the first in the Academy of Music Ballroom, as Linda, as director of the Academy of Music, seems to be in charge of everything that night.

Senator Connie Williams, now chair of the Philadelphia Museum of Art board, had a chance to chat with the museum's Joe Rishel at the Academy of Music.

Senator Connie Williams, now chair of the Philadelphia Museum of Art board, had a chance to chat with the museum’s Joe Rishel at the Academy of Music.



Senator Bob Casey and his wife Terese (center) arrived at the Academy of Music with Richard and Betsy Sheerer.
Senator Bob Casey and his wife Terese (center) arrived at the Academy of Music with Richard and Betsy Sheerer.



Hope Cohen and Richard Green go through the receiving line at the Academy of Music.

Hope Cohen and Richard Green go through the receiving line at the Academy of Music.



Gary Steuer, Philadelphia director of cultural arts in Mayor Nutter's cabinet, attended the festivities with his deputy, Moira Bayleson.
Gary Steuer, Philadelphia director of cultural arts in Mayor Nutter’s cabinet, attended the festivities with his deputy, Moira Bayleson.



David Eisner, the CEO of the National Constitution center, was on hand with his wife Lori.

David Eisner, the CEO of the National Constitution center, was on hand with his wife Lori.



Marsha and Jeffrey Perelman enjoying the festivities.  Jeffrey serves on the Academy of Music Committee.
Marsha and Jeffrey Perelman enjoying the festivities.  Jeffrey serves on the Academy of Music Committee.



David and Sandy Marshall in the receiving line, standing with Academy of Music preisdent and CEO Joanna McNeil Lewis and musician Michael Mills.  Sandy served as co-chair of the Academy Ball.

David and Sandy Marshall in the receiving line, standing with Academy of Music preisdent and CEO Joanna McNeil Lewis and musician Michael Mills.  Sandy served as co-chair of the Academy Ball.



Peter Nero, of the Philly Pops, chatted with philanthropist Anne Hamilton at the President's Reception.  Hamilton chairs the Academy of Music Committee.
Peter Nero, of the Philly Pops, chatted with philanthropist Anne Hamilton at the President’s Reception.  Hamilton chairs the Academy of Music Committee.



John and Christina Saler enjoyed starting the evening at the Academy of Music Ballroom.

John and Christina Saler enjoyed starting the evening at the Academy of Music Ballroom.  



In the Bellevue ballroom, following the reception and concert, are (l to r) Allan Greenspan, M.D., his wife Justice Jane Greenspan (ret.), and Howard Silverman.
In the Bellevue ballroom, following the reception and concert, are (l to r) Allan Greenspan, M.D., his wife Justice Jane Greenspan (ret.), and Howard Silverman.


Photos courtesy of Bonnie Squires