Ohev Shalom of Bucks County hosting Color Walk/Run September 23rd, 2018

Last year’s Color Run was so much fun that Ohev Shalom of Bucks County will host another community wide Family Fun Color Walk/Run on September 23rd at 9:00 am! The Color Walk/Run is an untimed 5k fun run for all ages and fitness abilities. Along the route, participants pass through vibrant color zones, making it a “colorful experience.” Additionally, each pre-registered participant is provided with a single powder color packet that will be thrown in the air at the final color celebration at the finish line.

Last Year, Lindsay Miller noted that “We want to engage the entire community in a fitness initiative that aims to encourage a life-long healthy way of living.” Registrants will receive a t-shirt and an individual color packet. You can sign up for the run by completing a registration form available at

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07efkxh3j664a4f9e6&llr=6k59eecab

Alternatively, you can call 215-322-9595. Registration is $18 / person.

Sponsorship opportunities are also available in addition to the registration fee. We hope that you consider becoming a sponsor for this fun event, and each level of sponsorship comes with its own color:

Green — $18

Blue — $36

Red — $54

Purple — $118

Orange – Donation of your Choice

We look forward to you joining us for our 2018 Color Run at Warminster Community Park on Sunday, September 23rd. Ohev Shalom celebrates the uniqueness of each individual and welcomes diversity within our sacred community. For an at glance view of the event, please see the information below.

 

At A Glance

WHAT: Family Fun Color Walk/Run for Ohev Shalom of Bucks County

WHEN: September 23rd, 2018 at 9:00 am

WHERE: Warminster Community Park 1100 Veterans Way Warminster, PA 18974

CONTACT: Lindsay Miller – 215-322-9595

 

Family Fun Color Walk/Run for Ohev Shalom of Bucks County

Jewish Speed Dating 20’s-30’s!

It’s a new year, so it’s a great time to start a new relationship!

Speed dating is a fun and different way to meet new people and was started by a Rabbi to bring Jewish singles together.

Join us for a night of great conversations with Jewish singles 20’s-30’s at the Infusion Lounge

Check in starts at 6:45pm

After the speed dating event, please join us for a singles mixer to socialize more without being timed!

24-48 hours after the event we’ll email you your matches.

Please email or message us at facebook.com/besinglenomore or at [email protected] if you have any questions. We hope to see you there and that you catch your match!

Dress Code: Polos or collared shirts, blouse, jacket & tie, cocktail dress, slacks, dress shoes, no athletic wear, sneakers, hats etc.

An Evening With Frank Luntz

“American Public Opinion About Israel: What Forms It and What Can Pro-Israel Advocates Do To Help Improve It” will be the focus of TV personality and public-opinion maven Frank Luntz’s presentation.

The event takes place on Tuesday, June 26 at the Philadelphia Marriott at 1201 Market St.

The presentation begins at 7 p.m.

Please consider joining us at 6 p.m. for an exclusive Patrons’ Reception with Luntz where you can meet him and speak with him – there will not be an opportunity to do so during the presentation. The reception will include glatt-kosher food plus wines from Israel.
Tickets are $36/$18 for students and those ages 25 and younger for the presentation only.

Reception tickets are $200 each and include admission to Luntz’s presentation.

Tickets are on sale now at Eventbrite.com and you can also purchase them by check.
Purchase tickets online at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-with-frank-luntz-taylor-forum-tickets-46327028389
Checks made payable to “ZOA” can be sent to: ZOA, P.O. Box 56, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19066.

This is a Taylor Forum event presented by Greater Philadelphia ZOA in memory of attorney and dedicated Zionist Jerome Taylor, who was a Greater Philadelphia ZOA board member.
For more information, call our Office at 610-660-9466.

Celebrate Passover at Temple Beth Ami

Temple Beth Ami invites you to celebrate the first night of Passover with us at 7:00 PM on Friday, March 30th.  Bring your friends and family to share in the beauty and remembrances of a delicious traditional Pesach Seder.  Please RSVP with payment by Monday, March 26th (NO money will be accepted at the door).

Prices: Members: $45; Nonmembers: $52; Kids: $28 (up to 13)

Payments can be mailed or dropped off during office hours to:

Temple Beth Ami located at 9201 Old Bustleton Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19115

Office Hours: Monday-Wednesday 9:00 AM-4:00 PM, Thursday 9:00 AM-7:00 PM or Friday 9:00 AM-2:00 PM.

For more information stop by the office, call: 215-673-2511 or email: [email protected].

The Grand Lady Of Jewish Jazz

Come and enjoy the musical stylings of Israeli performer and composer Zlata Razdolina as she presents original compositions, based on the blending of her personal style with traditional Klezmer jazz. The program will include dynamic dance pieces with elements of jazz, as well as compositions dedicated to Israel, such as “Israeli Rhapsody,”” Tel Aviv,” among others.  In addition, Zlata Razdolina will perform Jewish folk songs in Yiddish, popular songs in Hebrew, and powerful original songs about Israel.   To add to the magic of the evening, a jazz band will be accompanying Mrs. Razdolina’s performance.

Zlata Razdolina has been one of the leading composers and pezlata razdolina jewish jazzrformers of Klezmer Jazz for many years. Razdolina was born in Leningrad (St. Petersburg), where she also gained her musical education. An acclaimed artist, she is a laureate of many national and international music competitions, as well as the author of over 600 musical pieces in various genres. Zlata Razdolina’s compositions have been broadcast on BBC and on various radio stations worldwide.

Zlata tours internationally with her original compositions, which effortlessly combine different worlds and cultures. Today, Zlata Razdolina is happy to share her incredible gift with the world by performing her music for a live audience. We are delighted to be able to host her, so join us in celebrating this talent!

Being Jewish During Christmas: 10 Easy Steps

Photo by Joe Goldberg https://www.flickr.com/photos/goldberg/

Photo by Joe Goldberg

Being Jewish in the diaspora is especially difficult during Christmas. Christmas is such a shiny and beautiful celebration, that it is hard for Hanukkah not to be eclipsed by it. I decided to rise to the challenge. Here is how I did it.

1) Acknowledge the beauty of Christmas

Honesty is key. The Christmas decorations and lights are lovely. There is no harm in saying so. My family enjoyed admiring them all around us. At no time were christmas decorations allowed in our home, and my kids were never permitted to help their friends decorate a Christmas tree.

2) Control the radio and television

As soon as Thanksgiving is over, the broadcast media inundates everyone with Christmas music and movies. We made a point of listening to Hanukkah and Israeli music, and to watch movies about Hanukkah. We created our own Hanukkah bubble, which was surrounded by Christmas.

3) Instill pride with the retelling of the story of the Maccabees

Tell your kids the story of the bravery of the Maccabees. Use whatever resources you have at your disposal to bring it to life. Most kids are fascinated to discover that the weapon of mass destruction during their time was the war elephant.

4) Make Hanukkah crafts

We made our own beeswax candles and hanukiot. It was so much more meaningful for the children to light a menorah they had made themselves.

5) Participate in community celebrations

Your family may join an ice menorah sculpting and lighting happening, or go to the Latkepalooza to taste non-traditional latkes. Communal menorah lightings and celebrations are a wonderful way to feel part of your People during Hanukkah.

Photo by MathKnight https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:MathKnight

Photo by MathKnight https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:MathKnight

6) Create your own Hanukkah fun

We celebrated Hanukkah by making our own gelt, preparing latkes and sufganiot, and hosting at least one Hanukkah party. It is fun to serve Israeli foods during a Hanukkah party, as well as Sephardic treats and specialties from other Jewish communities. Of course, no Hanukkah party is complete without the dreidel game.

7) Light an olive oil menorah

Lighting an olive oil menorah transports you back in time to the Temple in Jerusalem. Your family can relive the rededication of the Temple after the victory of the Maccabees, and the lighting of the pure oil.

8) Give great presents!

If you examine the reasons young children are envious of Christmas, one of the main ones is that gifts are involved. This one is easy to solve. I told my kids that while children who celebrate Christmas get gifts during only one day, kids who celebrate Hanukkah get gifts during eight nights. Then, I went out and bought eight great gifts for each of them. They had something to look forward to every day. When Christmas and Hanukkah were over, all the kids at school compared what they had received. My children were satisfied with their gifts.

9) Bond with other Jews

There is a special bond that forms in December between Jews. There are enough of us in the Philadelphia area that together we share a special Christmas tradition. Have dinner at a restaurant in Chinatown, and then go to a movie. Check the Jewish community listings for special activities and events scheduled on December 24 and 25. Single people in our community should go to the matzah ball where they can mingle with other eligible single Jews. Even when Christmas and Hanukkah don’t overlap, non-Christmas feels like our own special holiday.

10) Be genuinely happy for your Christian friends.

I always wish my Christian friends a happy Christmas, and I mean it. I love hearing about their different traditions and recipes. I have modeled this behavior for my family.

My kids are now young adults. I asked them what they thought of their Hanukkah experience growing up in the United States. They told me that Christmas is a beautiful holiday, and that they feel so lucky to be Jews celebrating Hanukkah.

Essen: A Little Jewish Bakery in South Philly

photo (7)As the aroma of freshly baked challah wafts down Passyunk Avenue, South Philly is returning to its Jewish roots. The source of the heavenly smell is Essen, a new Jewish bakery. “Essen,” which means, “eat!” in Yiddish, is the creation of Tova du Plessis.

Tova du Plessis, originally from Johannesburg, was dutifully studying to be a physician. After obtaining a bachelor’s degree in biology, she pivoted toward her true love and attended culinary school. Ms. du Plessis honed her craft at Citron & Rose, Le Bec Fin, and The Rittenhouse Hotel. After the birth of her first child, she felt ready for another new challenge, and decided to open her own shop.

Serendipitously, the proprietor of her local bakery decided to pursue other opportunities. Tova du Plessis was able to rent the bakery with all of its equipment. She tapped into the memories of preparing Shabbat dinners with her mother in South Africa. Then, she tweaked the recipes a little bit.

13122909_487661448094640_5776031625427631548_oThree types of challah are baked at Essen. There is a fragrant, slightly sweet plain challah, a saltier seeded challah, and an exotic za’atar challah. Fresh labaneh with olive oil and za’atar is available for purchase to pair with the za’atar challah. These challahs are soft, chewy, moist, and pareve. I bought all three for Shabbat dinner. When my father bit into the plain challah, he told my mother, “this is just like the ones you bake!”

Jewish apple cake, chocolate chip – sea salt cookies, and cheese cake with house made strawberry preserves are baked on the premises. The crowning cakes of the display case are the babkas. These delicious yeast cakes are baked with cinnamon and hazelnuts or chocolate and halva.

13112996_484225865104865_1420751969339691223_oI must confess that the chocolate-halva babka was so wickedly decadent that I knew that it would be a sin for me to tempt anyone who knows me with it. This is why I sat at a table in the corner of Essen’s cozy café and ate the whole delicious slice by myself.

Essen Bakery
Address: 1437 E Passyunk Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19147
Phone:(215) 271-2299
Hours:
Friday 8AM–6PM
Saturday 8AM–6PM
Sunday 8AM–3PM
Monday Closed
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday 8AM–6PM
Thursday 8AM–6PM
https://www.facebook.com/essenbakery/

Theater Review: Chekhov’s “The Three Sisters” at the Arden Theatre


Left to right: Sarah Sanford, Mary Tuomanen and Katherine Powell. Photo by Mark Garvin.

The world premiere of a new translation of The Three Sisters by Anton Chekhov, playing at the Arden Theatre until April 20, is a vibrant, well-acted, well-directed production that should not be missed this season.  

Chekhov’s influential story about a family’s unrealized aspirations was translated by Curt Columbus, and is directed by Terrence J. Nolen.

“Chekhov isn’t easy — there’s not a tried and true method to make his work speak to modern audiences,” stated Nolen, Arden’s producing artistic director. “But no other playwright speaks more eloquently to the essence of the human condition, and that challenge is irresistible to me as a director.”  

Through research, workshops, readings, and travel, the play is the culmination of a two-year exploration of the master storyteller’s work that took the theater company from Moscow to Providence, Rhode Island to Philadelphia.

More after the jump.

“The Three Sisters” was originally performed at the Moscow Theatre in 1901. It is a classic four-act drama that examines the lives of the three Prozorov sisters and their brother Andrei, who have lived for 11 years in a small provincial town, where their late father had commanded a brigade. Unsuited for provincial life, the sisters long to return to Moscow, their childhood home and idealized haven.  

Although there is not a single Jew among these characters, there is something profoundly heimish in Chekhov’s play, as Diane Samuels wrote in the Jewish Quarterly:

No Jew would have inhabited this social milieu. And yet the sense of community, the emotional highs and lows, the ill-tempered humor, the corny asides, the affection, the melodrama, the poignancy, the hope, the despair, all — as actress Tracy-Ann Oberman insightfully noted when she first mentioned to me that she hoped to find a writer ready to take up the challenge of writing a Jewish version of the play — smack of something very Jewish indeed. Maybe it is the Russian background.

Still, a leap was required to find a way of extrapolating the Jewishness out of Chekhov.

This moving production’s most innovative turn takes place in the first act. We are watching a play within a play, as the actors seem to be having a dress rehearsal for a play, which is being videotaped as we watch it. Refreshingly disconcerting, the clever technique works, and by the time we get to the second act we are in the play itself, but the intimations of the video and the sense of life being a dress rehearsal linger.  

All three “sisters” are outstanding in their respective roles: Katherine Powell as Masha, the sardonic, restless middle sister; Sarah Sanford as Olga, the oldest sister; and Mary Tuomanen as Irina, the youngest sister.  

Lt. Colonel Alexander Vershinin, portrayed by Ian Merrill Peakes, is the play’s philosopher:

There will come a time when everybody will know why, for what purpose, there is all this suffering, and there will be no more mysteries. But now we must live… we must work, just work!

Fine. Since the tea is not forthcoming, let’s have a philosophical conversation.  

Chekhov might not have been Jewish but he speaks to the human condition in this sad, poignant play that embraces all of life: from the boredom of marriage to the ravages of war, from the hopes of youth to the regrets of the middle age. Near the end of the play, Vershinin reflects on that:  

In two or three hundred years life on earth will be unimaginably beautiful, amazing, astonishing. Man has need of that life and if it doesn’t yet exist, he must sense it, wait for it and dream of it, prepare to receive it, and to achieve that he must see and know more than our grandfathers and fathers saw or knew.  


The full cast of “Three Sisters.” Photo by Mark Garvin.

In “The Three Sisters,” Chekhov has written a masterwork that doesn’t reduce life to easy platitudes or resolutions, but captures the fleeting nature of life in four acts that the Arden’s production staff honors in its bold new production.

Single ticket prices are between $36 and $48, with discounts available for seniors, students, military and educators. Groups of 15 or more enjoy significant discounts. Main stage subscriptions are on sale for between $84 and $135.

For tickets, call the Arden’s box office at 215-922-1122, order online, or visit the box office at 40 N. 2nd Street in Old City, Philadelphia.

Post-show discussions will be held following the performances on March 30 at 2 p.m., April 3 at 8 p.m., April 9 at 6:30 p.m., April 13 at 2 p.m., and April 16 at 6:30 p.m.