Bucks County Synagogue Builds a Virtual Community

Synagogue Ohev Shalom of Bucks County has responded to the Coronavirus crisis in unique and inspiring ways.

 

As are many religious institutions, the synagogue is using the Zoom platform for weekday and Sabbath worship. Working from their homes, Ohev Shalom synagogue clergy and lay leaders have decided to expand outreach via a variety of communication and social media platforms to ensure all members of the synagogue’s community are heard from and cared for during these difficult times.

Rabbi Eliott Perlstein meets with congregants on Tuesday afternoons for a Zoom Torah discussion and for virtual coffee and conversation on Thursday afternoons. Cantor Annelise Ocanto-Romo and son join parents and children on Zoom every Wednesday morning for Circle Time. On Wednesday afternoons Cantor hosts a sing-along.

 

On Friday morning, Director of Education, Barbara Glickman hosts a Facebook Live story time. Havdalah services are shared with the synagogue community, also through Facebook Live, Saturday evening from the home of Cantor Ocanto-Romo.

 

Anticipating the shutdown we now face, Education Director Glickman and the Ohev faculty planned for and were ready for an early transition to web-based Hebrew School classes. Parent, Kari Spivak, conveys the enthusiasm faculty, students, and parents have for this new way to study and learn: “Big thanks to Ohev Shalom and its teachers for making these unforeseen circumstances seamless for our children! Facetiming with the students keeps them connected to our incredible Ohev Shalom family.”

Even more ways to keep connected are happening at the now virtual Ohev Shalom. A weekly Noon Zoom, hosted by Building Supervisor, Hilary Leboff, gives congregants an opportunity to chat and share in an informal and relaxed atmosphere. On Monday afternoons, Glickman will host Hebrew Through Movement for all ages. The synagogue’s Caring Committee will be regularly reaching out by telephone to those congregants who may be alone and/or aren’t able or willing to connect digitally to the surrounding community. “During this challenging time, Ohev Shalom of Bucks County’s commitment to Inclusion B’Kavod (inclusion with respect) is more relevant and important than ever. With our virtual programming we continue to ensure that all members of our congregation are able to participate meaningfully, educationally, and spiritually,” states congregant and board member Lindsay Miller.

 

“In this time of isolation, people need the loving support of their religious community” explains Rabbi Perlstein. “While our building is closed, our hearts are open to caring and supporting each other.”

 

Ohev Shalom of Bucks County

Ohev Shalom of Bucks County is a vibrant and dynamic congregation affiliated with the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism. While we have grown considerably from our 22 founding families in 1976 to approximately 500 today, we have worked hard to maintain a spirit of caring for each individual member of our community. Ohev Shalom celebrates the uniqueness of each individual and welcomes diversity within our sacred community.

No Other But You – Yosef Goldman

No Other But You – YOSEF GOLDMAN

THURSDAY, MARCH 19 AT 7:30 PM

PHILADELPHIA EPISCOPAL CATHEDRAL

23 S. 38TH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19104

The transformative power of music envelopes the audience through the songs and sounds of Rabbi Yosef Goldman. From aspiration and yearning to heartache and joy, Goldman infuses his work with a palette of deep emotions. Drawing from traditional Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jewish sacred music and a panoply of global sounds, Goldman creates a dynamic musical event.

Tickets are $20 online and $25 at the door. Student tickets are available for $10, and are available for those under 18 and those with a student ID.

LISTEN

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

The Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral has an ADA accessible entrance.

The Cathedral is located 2 blocks from the Market-Frankford Subway Line stop at 40th Street Station, and 3 blocks from the 36th Street Trolley Portal. The Cathedral is also accessible via SEPTA bus lines 21, 30, 40, and 42.

Ample street parking (paid and free) is available in this neighborhood, as are parking garages located along Market Street.

Ohev Shalom of Bucks County hosting Color Walk/Run September 23rd, 2018

Last year’s Color Run was so much fun that Ohev Shalom of Bucks County will host another community wide Family Fun Color Walk/Run on September 23rd at 9:00 am! The Color Walk/Run is an untimed 5k fun run for all ages and fitness abilities. Along the route, participants pass through vibrant color zones, making it a “colorful experience.” Additionally, each pre-registered participant is provided with a single powder color packet that will be thrown in the air at the final color celebration at the finish line.

Last Year, Lindsay Miller noted that “We want to engage the entire community in a fitness initiative that aims to encourage a life-long healthy way of living.” Registrants will receive a t-shirt and an individual color packet. You can sign up for the run by completing a registration form available at

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07efkxh3j664a4f9e6&llr=6k59eecab

Alternatively, you can call 215-322-9595. Registration is $18 / person.

Sponsorship opportunities are also available in addition to the registration fee. We hope that you consider becoming a sponsor for this fun event, and each level of sponsorship comes with its own color:

Green — $18

Blue — $36

Red — $54

Purple — $118

Orange – Donation of your Choice

We look forward to you joining us for our 2018 Color Run at Warminster Community Park on Sunday, September 23rd. Ohev Shalom celebrates the uniqueness of each individual and welcomes diversity within our sacred community. For an at glance view of the event, please see the information below.

 

At A Glance

WHAT: Family Fun Color Walk/Run for Ohev Shalom of Bucks County

WHEN: September 23rd, 2018 at 9:00 am

WHERE: Warminster Community Park 1100 Veterans Way Warminster, PA 18974

CONTACT: Lindsay Miller – 215-322-9595

 

Family Fun Color Walk/Run for Ohev Shalom of Bucks County

Jewish Speed Dating 20’s-30’s!

It’s a new year, so it’s a great time to start a new relationship!

Speed dating is a fun and different way to meet new people and was started by a Rabbi to bring Jewish singles together.

Join us for a night of great conversations with Jewish singles 20’s-30’s at the Infusion Lounge

Check in starts at 6:45pm

After the speed dating event, please join us for a singles mixer to socialize more without being timed!

24-48 hours after the event we’ll email you your matches.

Please email or message us at facebook.com/besinglenomore or at [email protected] if you have any questions. We hope to see you there and that you catch your match!

Dress Code: Polos or collared shirts, blouse, jacket & tie, cocktail dress, slacks, dress shoes, no athletic wear, sneakers, hats etc.

An Evening With Frank Luntz

“American Public Opinion About Israel: What Forms It and What Can Pro-Israel Advocates Do To Help Improve It” will be the focus of TV personality and public-opinion maven Frank Luntz’s presentation.

The event takes place on Tuesday, June 26 at the Philadelphia Marriott at 1201 Market St.

The presentation begins at 7 p.m.

Please consider joining us at 6 p.m. for an exclusive Patrons’ Reception with Luntz where you can meet him and speak with him – there will not be an opportunity to do so during the presentation. The reception will include glatt-kosher food plus wines from Israel.
Tickets are $36/$18 for students and those ages 25 and younger for the presentation only.

Reception tickets are $200 each and include admission to Luntz’s presentation.

Tickets are on sale now at Eventbrite.com and you can also purchase them by check.
Purchase tickets online at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-with-frank-luntz-taylor-forum-tickets-46327028389
Checks made payable to “ZOA” can be sent to: ZOA, P.O. Box 56, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19066.

This is a Taylor Forum event presented by Greater Philadelphia ZOA in memory of attorney and dedicated Zionist Jerome Taylor, who was a Greater Philadelphia ZOA board member.
For more information, call our Office at 610-660-9466.

Celebrate Passover at Temple Beth Ami

Temple Beth Ami invites you to celebrate the first night of Passover with us at 7:00 PM on Friday, March 30th.  Bring your friends and family to share in the beauty and remembrances of a delicious traditional Pesach Seder.  Please RSVP with payment by Monday, March 26th (NO money will be accepted at the door).

Prices: Members: $45; Nonmembers: $52; Kids: $28 (up to 13)

Payments can be mailed or dropped off during office hours to:

Temple Beth Ami located at 9201 Old Bustleton Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19115

Office Hours: Monday-Wednesday 9:00 AM-4:00 PM, Thursday 9:00 AM-7:00 PM or Friday 9:00 AM-2:00 PM.

For more information stop by the office, call: 215-673-2511 or email: [email protected].

The Grand Lady Of Jewish Jazz

Come and enjoy the musical stylings of Israeli performer and composer Zlata Razdolina as she presents original compositions, based on the blending of her personal style with traditional Klezmer jazz. The program will include dynamic dance pieces with elements of jazz, as well as compositions dedicated to Israel, such as “Israeli Rhapsody,”” Tel Aviv,” among others.  In addition, Zlata Razdolina will perform Jewish folk songs in Yiddish, popular songs in Hebrew, and powerful original songs about Israel.   To add to the magic of the evening, a jazz band will be accompanying Mrs. Razdolina’s performance.

Zlata Razdolina has been one of the leading composers and pezlata razdolina jewish jazzrformers of Klezmer Jazz for many years. Razdolina was born in Leningrad (St. Petersburg), where she also gained her musical education. An acclaimed artist, she is a laureate of many national and international music competitions, as well as the author of over 600 musical pieces in various genres. Zlata Razdolina’s compositions have been broadcast on BBC and on various radio stations worldwide.

Zlata tours internationally with her original compositions, which effortlessly combine different worlds and cultures. Today, Zlata Razdolina is happy to share her incredible gift with the world by performing her music for a live audience. We are delighted to be able to host her, so join us in celebrating this talent!

Being Jewish During Christmas: 10 Easy Steps

Photo by Joe Goldberg https://www.flickr.com/photos/goldberg/

Photo by Joe Goldberg

Being Jewish in the diaspora is especially difficult during Christmas. Christmas is such a shiny and beautiful celebration, that it is hard for Hanukkah not to be eclipsed by it. I decided to rise to the challenge. Here is how I did it.

1) Acknowledge the beauty of Christmas

Honesty is key. The Christmas decorations and lights are lovely. There is no harm in saying so. My family enjoyed admiring them all around us. At no time were christmas decorations allowed in our home, and my kids were never permitted to help their friends decorate a Christmas tree.

2) Control the radio and television

As soon as Thanksgiving is over, the broadcast media inundates everyone with Christmas music and movies. We made a point of listening to Hanukkah and Israeli music, and to watch movies about Hanukkah. We created our own Hanukkah bubble, which was surrounded by Christmas.

3) Instill pride with the retelling of the story of the Maccabees

Tell your kids the story of the bravery of the Maccabees. Use whatever resources you have at your disposal to bring it to life. Most kids are fascinated to discover that the weapon of mass destruction during their time was the war elephant.

4) Make Hanukkah crafts

We made our own beeswax candles and hanukiot. It was so much more meaningful for the children to light a menorah they had made themselves.

5) Participate in community celebrations

Your family may join an ice menorah sculpting and lighting happening, or go to the Latkepalooza to taste non-traditional latkes. Communal menorah lightings and celebrations are a wonderful way to feel part of your People during Hanukkah.

Photo by MathKnight https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:MathKnight

Photo by MathKnight https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:MathKnight

6) Create your own Hanukkah fun

We celebrated Hanukkah by making our own gelt, preparing latkes and sufganiot, and hosting at least one Hanukkah party. It is fun to serve Israeli foods during a Hanukkah party, as well as Sephardic treats and specialties from other Jewish communities. Of course, no Hanukkah party is complete without the dreidel game.

7) Light an olive oil menorah

Lighting an olive oil menorah transports you back in time to the Temple in Jerusalem. Your family can relive the rededication of the Temple after the victory of the Maccabees, and the lighting of the pure oil.

8) Give great presents!

If you examine the reasons young children are envious of Christmas, one of the main ones is that gifts are involved. This one is easy to solve. I told my kids that while children who celebrate Christmas get gifts during only one day, kids who celebrate Hanukkah get gifts during eight nights. Then, I went out and bought eight great gifts for each of them. They had something to look forward to every day. When Christmas and Hanukkah were over, all the kids at school compared what they had received. My children were satisfied with their gifts.

9) Bond with other Jews

There is a special bond that forms in December between Jews. There are enough of us in the Philadelphia area that together we share a special Christmas tradition. Have dinner at a restaurant in Chinatown, and then go to a movie. Check the Jewish community listings for special activities and events scheduled on December 24 and 25. Single people in our community should go to the matzah ball where they can mingle with other eligible single Jews. Even when Christmas and Hanukkah don’t overlap, non-Christmas feels like our own special holiday.

10) Be genuinely happy for your Christian friends.

I always wish my Christian friends a happy Christmas, and I mean it. I love hearing about their different traditions and recipes. I have modeled this behavior for my family.

My kids are now young adults. I asked them what they thought of their Hanukkah experience growing up in the United States. They told me that Christmas is a beautiful holiday, and that they feel so lucky to be Jews celebrating Hanukkah.