PJFF Closing Night: Women In Shorts

For its closing night, the Philadelphia Jewish Film Festival presents four short Israeli films made by and about women:

  • In Women in Sink, winner of multiple international film awards, director Iris Zaki chats about living in what she sees as a divided country with Arab and Jewish women getting their hair done at a small, neighborhood hair salon in the heart of Haifa.
  • In Operator, a single mom, who works as a drone operator, finds a parallel universe at home, with her son playing video games, similarly pressing buttons to determine one’s fate in a virtual world.
  • In The Fine Line, winner of the Special Mention Award at the 2015 Jerusalem Film Festival, a young aspiring actress must compromise her personal boundaries while filming a love scene.
  • Winner of Best Independent Short Film at the Haifa International Film Festival and the opening film at the International Student Film Festival in Tel Aviv, Hounds is a bizarrely comic allegory exploring a day in the life of an all female unit of security guards working in an Israeli contemporary art museum.

Guest Speakers: Iris Drechsler (moderator), PJFF artistic chair; Gil Sima, producer of “Hounds”; Omer Tobi, director of “Hounds”; and Iris Zaki, director of “Women in Sink”

Special Event: Film followed by closing night party with food, libations and music

Film trailers available on closing night webpage.

Buy tickets here.

The Israel Peace Paradox

Dome of the Rock above Western Wall.

Dome of the Rock above Western Wall.

Since its re-establishment in 1948, Israel has sought to live in peace with both its Arab citizens and its Arab neighbors. Yet, there are several biblical injunctions that are seemingly in conflict with each other regarding Israel’s responsibilities to promote and seek peace, and protect itself from its enemies. [Read more…]

Jewish Organizations Respond to the Election of Donald Trump

In a letter to the president-elect on behalf of B’nai B’rith International (BBI), the organization’s president, Gary P. Saltzman, and its executive vice president, Daniel S. Mariaschin, congratulate Donald Trump on his “historic victory in the presidential election” and promise their “active support.” The letter continues, “We warmly welcome your election night pledge to help the country ‘bind the wounds of division’ and ‘come together as one people.’”

Donald_Trump_August_19,_2015_(cropped)After enumerating a litany of issues that the president-elect will confront when he assumes the office of president, Saltzman and Mariaschin direct their attention to Israel:

B’nai B’rith applauds your stated commitment to Israel’s security and your pledge to do everything in your power to prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons. We recognize that American leadership — and America’s crucial partnership with its democratic ally Israel — are essential to our shared goal of a peaceful and stable Middle East. It greatly reassures us, therefore, to know that Israel, the Middle East’s only democracy and a country that has battled terror and aggression since its independence, will have a staunch ally in the president of the United States.

The Jewish Council for Public Affairs (JCPA) also congratulates Donald Trump on his victory, but urges reconciliation for this divided nation.

“We wish President-elect Trump well moving forward,” says David Bernstein, JCPA’s president and CEO. “We commend him on the message of unity he conveyed in his acceptance speech, and urge him to continue to work toward bringing the country together.”

“The American people have spoken,” says Cheryl Fishbein, board chair of JCPA. “And as our great democratic tradition dictates, it’s time for a peaceful transition of power.”

“We call upon the president-elect to continue to assure the nation, particularly constituencies feeling most vulnerable, that the country will live up to its highest ideals and respect the rights of all people,” says Bernstein.

“Zionism: The Birth and Transformation of an Ideal,” by Milton Viorst

Zionism: The Birth and Transformation of an Ideal,” is ambitious in its scope, and original in its format. The history follows chapters on critical figures including Theodor Herzl, Chaim Weizmann, Vladimir Jabotinsky, David Ben-Gurion, Rav Abraham Isaac Kook and Rabbi Zvi Yehuda Kook, Menachem Begin, and a final chapter “Arriving at Netanyahu.” But it is clear from the outset that this will not be a fair and balanced history. [Read more…]

Word Choices Matter: FactsOnIsrael.com

Who is the Occupier?

Who is the Occupier?

The right of the Jewish people to their homeland of Israel is greatly misunderstood. This is partly because the mainstream media has adopted the delegitimizing language of Israel’s foes, but also in part because we who are well-meaning supporters of Israel ourselves unthinkingly use these terms. Both of these practices contribute greatly to the widespread bias against Israel.

FactsOnIsrael.com, Inc., was incorporated in 2016 as a Pennsylvania non-profit entity, with a website, Facebook page, mobile app, and other activities to make clear to Jewish homeland supporters the connotations and nuances of words used in Israel-related discussion, and to encourage Israel supporters’ own use of historically-grounded terms, which reflect the Jewish people’s three-millennia connection to the land of Israel, and not Jewish-homeland delegitimizing pejoratives.

FactsOnIsrael.com website.

FactsOnIsrael.com website.

For example, “West Bank” is not a synonym for Judea and Samaria, but an antonym. The biblical names Judæa and Samaria (יְהוּדָה וְשׁוֹמְרוֹן) remained in use all through the 1800 years of continuous foreign rule between Romans’ destruction of the Jewish kingdom Judaea in CE 135 and the State of Israel’s attainment of independence in 1948 as the land of Israel’s next native state. The United Nations referred to “the hill country of Samaria and Judea,” not to “the West Bank,” in its partition resolution of 1947. “West Bank” was coined in 1950 by the invader Jordan, for the same reason the Romans renamed Judæa as “Palestine” in 135 – to disassociate the Jewish homeland from Jews.

There are a host of other historically incorrect misleading terms – e .g., misstatement of the 1949 Israel-Jordan military ceasefire lines, expressly declared in the Armistice Agreement not to be political borders as “Israel’s 1967 borders,” reference to “East” Jerusalem, which existed only during the Jordanian seizure of 1948-67, as though it had always been a separate city, not part of a single city, Jerusalem, that’s been the capital of three states, all Jewish, and has had a renewed Jewish majority since 1800’s Ottoman rule. Calling contested territories “occupied,” and Jewish communities “settlements” but Arab communities “towns and villages,” and labeling Israel “apartheid” likewise one-sidedly denigrates Israel.

The UNESCO resolution that disassociates Jerusalem from the Jewish People and calls the Temple Mount only by its Islamic name is blatantly contrary to historical evidence and is an insult to Jews and Christians. Even Islamic texts and 20th century guidebooks attest to the Jewish connection with King Solomon’s Temple.

Through explanations of toxic terms on our website; our book, “Pressing Israel: Media Bias Exposed From A-to-Z,” PowerPoint presentations to groups (some on our website), published articles, instructive videos in TED-talk fashion, and other means, we work to make clear to our own camp the critical importance of word choices, which everyone – Israel’s foes, the media, anti-Israel Jews – seems to grasp except us. We invite those seeking unfiltered facts on Israel to visit www.factsonisrael.com.

Contact: Lee S. Bender, President: 610-804-7882, [email protected]

Sukkot Snapshots from Israel

Photo credits: Adriana Katona

Sukkot is one of the three pilgrim holidays when the Israelites would go up to Jerusalem to celebrate. It was an agricultural holiday, as well as a reminder of the 40 years wandering in the wilderness before entering the land of Israel. Agriculture was central in their culture, so Sukkot was an important holiday. Today, Jews from all over the world travel to Jerusalem to celebrate.

Celebrating at the Kotel.

Celebrating at the Kotel (the Western Wall).

A selection of etrogs.

A selection of etrogs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is a mitzvah to give gifts to the poor during Sukkot. What type of gift? The farmers of Ancient Israel were required to give a tithe, ma’aser, of their harvest (Numbers 18:21-24) to the Levites. This harvest consisted of wheat, barley, oat, spelt, and rye.  In addition, they had to give a tithe of their production of wine, olive oil, fruit, and cattle.

Examining a lulav.

Examining a lulav.

Blowing the shofarot.

Blowing the shofarot.

Book Review: The Angel – The Egyptian Spy Who Saved Israel

What would motivate someone who lives a life steeped in success, status and power to deliver their nation’s most guarded secrets to its most dreaded enemy?

In Uri Bar-Joseph’s most recent book, The Angel, the answer is revealed as the reader follows a treacherous and circuitous route from Cairo to London to Tel Aviv. What turned out to be an extraordinary journey began in an iconic London red phone booth. It was from that booth that a call was clandestinely placed to the Mossad with an offer to spy for them. That call came from a most unlikely source, President Gamal Abdel Nasser’s son-in-law, Ashraf Marwan.
[Read more…]

Hillary Clinton Supports Historic Agreement Between U.S. and Israel

The United States and Israel signed a new Memorandum of Understanding that guarantees $3.8 billion of military assistance to Israel annually for the fiscal years from 2019 to 2028. This $38 billion total aid package is the largest pledge of military assistance by the United States to a single country in American history.‎ [Read more…]