The Arnold and Esther Tuzman Memorial Holocaust Teach-In

This biennial event draws hundreds of people to Gratz College for an afternoon of special programming on the Holocaust and genocide. Particularly exciting this year is the keynote address, which is being delivered by Dr. Deborah Lipstadt, the Emory University professor and expert on Holocaust denial, who was sued for libel in the United Kingdom for labeling English historian David Irving a Holocaust denier. Lipstadt’s trial is the subject of the new motion picture “Denial.”

The keynote address will be followed by two sessions in which participants can choose among a list of seminars on a wide range of topics, including music from the Holocaust, survivor stories, discussions of other genocides and much more. Hawa Abdallah Mohammed Salih, a survivor of genocide in Darfur who was presented the International Women of Courage Award by Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton, will share her experiences during one of these seminars. See the brochure for all seminar descriptions.

Schedule: Special programming for teachers begins at 9 a.m. Doors open for the main program at 1 p.m., with the program beginning at 1:30.

Admission Fees: General admission is $10; higher fees for teachers and attorneys seeking professional education credit.

The PROGRAM IS NOW FULL.

Genocide in the 21st Century

The Last Survivor explores the idea of genocide in the 21st century as a platform for social action.

— by David Felder, Nancy Strong and Sharon Shore

The term “genocide” is of relatively recent origin. It was first coined by Raphael Lemkin (1900-1959), a Polish-Jewish legal scholar, in 1944. Lemkin’s idea of genocide as an offense against international law was widely accepted by the international community and was one of the legal bases of the Nuremberg trials.

While most of us would prefer to think of genocide as something that belongs to another place and time, it is in fact, an evil that has occurred on nearly every continent in every century, and affects us all as human beings.

On January 28, 2012, Congregation Beth Hamedrosh of Wynnewood will present a program on genocide in the 21st century. The program will be informative and practical, focusing on specific actions that can be taken by individuals and organizations to help survivors of genocides in the 21st century. It will include a showing of the powerful documentary film, The Last Survivor, and a presentation by Dr. Henri Parens.

More after the jump.
Dr. Parens is a Holocaust survivor and a Professor of Psychiatry, Thomas Jefferson University, and a Training and Supervising Analyst at the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia. There will be an opportunity for discussion following Dr. Parens’ presentation.

The Last Survivor is a character-based, feature-length documentary that follows the lives of survivors of four different genocides – The Holocaust, Rwanda, Darfur, and Congo. By presenting these stories of loss, survival, and hope side by side, the film highlights the commonalities these individuals share, both as survivors and, more broadly, as human beings. Shot on location in five countries across four continents, the film focuses on the universality of the horror of genocide, combating the misguided
notion that genocide is something that happens “over there.” The Last Survivor has received national and international recognition including numerous film festival awards for best documentary.

The program will take place at 7:30 PM on Saturday, January 28, 2012 at Congregation Beth Hamedrosh, 200 Haverford Road, Wynnewood, PA. The charge for admission is $5.00 in advance and $8.00 at the door. Tickets can be obtained by contacting the synagogue office at (610) 642-6444.

Congregation Beth Hamedrosh is a mutually supportive community of families and individuals who are looking to grow, enjoy and share in an Orthodox way of life. We welcome Jews of all backgrounds and levels of observance. Through programs such as this presentation of The Last Survivor, CBH seeks to better understand how the Jewish community should respond to events in both the United States and the world.