Romney Little Different From Obama On Foreign Policy

— by David Streeter

Maeve Reston and Seema Mehta noted in the Los Angeles Times today that for all of his bluster and smears regarding the President’s foreign policy — including border-line “belligerent” statements — Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has yet to state what exactly he would do differently from the President on a wide range of issues.

Highlights of article follow the jump.

Romney has roughed up Obama with a hawkish tone – at times bordering on belligerent. Yet for all his criticisms of the president, it has been difficult to tell exactly what Romney would do differently.

He has argued that reelecting Obama will result in Iran having a nuclear weapon – without explaining how. He has charged that Obama should have taken ‘more assertive steps’ to force out the repressive regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad – but has said he is not ‘anxious to employ military action.’ He accused Obama of tipping his hand to the Taliban by announcing a timeline for withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan, but also accepts the 2014 timeline.

Romney’s approach could be seen in his take on the case of Chen Guangcheng, the blind Chinese activist who in early May sought shelter at the American Embassy before leaving his country. As Americans officials negotiated over his fate, Romney suggested that the Obama administration had put Chen in danger to placate the Chinese.

He said that if reports he had heard were true, ‘this is a dark day for freedom and it’s a day of shame for the Obama administration.’

Two weeks later, when Chen arrived in New York, Romney declared himself ‘relieved’ and said the episode ‘underscores the need for the United States to forthrightly stand up for the human rights of the Chinese people.’

At no point did he elaborate on how his approach would have differed from Obama’s.

Christopher Preble, a foreign policy expert at the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank, says he does not yet see ‘a huge difference’ between the foreign policy approaches of Obama and Romney.

‘A lot is made of Romney’s tough talk with respect to Russia and Iran and China, but even there it’s not like I see a dearth of toughness on the part of President Obama,’ Preble said….

Foreign policy is not Romney’s strength; 2008 GOP nominee John McCain defeated the former Massachusetts governor in primaries that year in part because of his international expertise. In Washington Post-ABC News poll last month, 53% of respondents said they trusted Obama to do a better job handling international affairs. Thirty-six percent picked Romney….

On Iran, Romney frequently faults Obama for waiting too long to put ‘crippling sanctions’ in place on the central bank and the petroleum industry, measures that the Obama administration agreed to late last year. But when asked what further steps Romney would take to crack down on Iran, campaign aides said they were keeping an eye on legislation working its way through Congress that would put sanctions on regime officials and that Romney’s main task would be to make sure the current sanctions are vigorously enforced.

In addition, Romney has said he would do more to support dissidents in Iran and make it clear that military action by the U.S. is a real option (something Romney charges Obama has failed to do, though the president has repeatedly said all options are on the table).

Shavuot Centerpiece: The Savory Cheesecake

One Local Summer wk 11: zucchini ricotta cheesecake (whole)— by Ronit Treatman

Traditionally, Shavuot is celebrated with sweet cheesecakes and blintzes, redolent of cinnamon, raisins, and sugar.  It is what we eat as we celebrate the giving of the Torah at Sinai.  The basic unsweetened cheesecake is a neutral palette.  It invites creativity!  Many cultures have a tradition of preparing savory cheesecakes.  For this year’s celebration, surprise your guests with something a little out of the ordinary.  Prepare a piquant cheesecake for a special holiday treat.

More after the jump.
The Ancient Greeks are credited with inventing the cheesecake.  Archaeologists discovered cheese molds from 2000 BCE on the island of Samos.  In Ancient Greece, cheesecake was prepared for Olympic athletes.  The most ancient recipe for cheesecake was written down by the Greek physician Aegimus.  The ingredients for his cake were cheese, honey, and flour.  He instructed cooks to pound the cheese and honey together with a mortar and pestle.  Flour was to be added to form a type of batter.  The resulting dough was baked in a wood-burning oven.  This cheesecake was believed to give the athletes energy.

In 146 BCE Rome conquered Greece.  The Romans adopted the cheesecake, and added a few special touches to it.  They mixed the cheese with eggs, and lined the baking vessel with fresh bay leaves.  Marcus Cato, a Roman politician, was the first to record a recipe for this cake called libum.  Below is an excerpt from his agricultural writings in which he explains how to prepare libum.

Libum to be made as follows: 2 pounds cheese well crushed in a mortar; when it is well crushed, add in 1 pound bread-wheat flour or, if you want it to be lighter, just 1/2 a pound, to be mixed with the cheese. Add one egg and mix all together well. Make a loaf of this, with the leaves under it, and cook slowly in a hot fire under a brick.”

The Romans spread the cheesecake throughout their empire.  Each new place added its own special touch to the recipe, transforming it.  Today there are many cheesecake recipes from all over the world.  Here are some savory cheesecake recipes you may prepare for your degustation this Shavuot.

Savory Cheesecake With Caramelized Shallots And Olives
Adapted from The Chubby Vegetarian

For the crust:

  • 1 ½ cups breadcrumbs (or ground almonds for a gluten-free crust)
  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 2 tablespoons fresh parsley leaves

For the filling:

  • 3 eggs
  • 6 oz. soft goat cheese
  • 15 oz. ricotta cheese
  • ¼ cup white wine
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • 1 tablespoon of extra virgin olive oil
  • 1-teaspoon fresh, minced rosemary
  • Salt and pepper to taste

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.  
  2. Oil a 9′ spring form pan.
  3. Grind all the crust ingredients together in a food processor.  
  4. Press this paste to the bottom of the baking pan.
  5. Bake the crust for about 7 minutes.
  6. Remove the crust from the oven.
  7. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan.
  8. Sautée the shallots until they are golden-brown.
  9. Add the wine, and reduce the heat.  
  10. Simmer until all the wine is absorbed.
  11. Place this shallot mixture and all the other filling ingredients in a food processor.
  12. Mix into a paste.
  13. Pour the cheese mixture over the crust.
  14. Bake for 50 minutes.
  15. Allow to cool.

Serve garnished with assorted cured olives, aged balsamic vinegar, and fresh parsley.

maple cheesecakeStilton Cheesecake
Adapted from My Recipes

  • 4 oz. Stilton cheese
  • 16 oz. cream cheese
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • 1-tablespoon flour (or ground almonds for a gluten-free recipe)
  • 2 eggs
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • ¼ tsp. garlic powder
  • ½ tsp. dry marjoram
  • ½ tsp. dry parsley
  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Oil a muffin pan.
  3. Mix all the ingredients in a mixer.
  4. Pour the batter into the muffin pan, filling each cup completely.
  5. Bake for 40 minutes.
  6. After the Stilton cheesecakes cool, refrigerate for 4 hours.

Serve cold, garnished with toasted walnuts.

Florentine Cheesecake
Adapted from Yummly

For the crust:

  • 8 tbsp. butter
  • 2 cups breadcrumbs (or ground almonds for a gluten-free recipe).

For the filling:

  • 1-¼ cups grated Gruyere cheese
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 20 oz. cream cheese
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
  • 4 eggs
  • ¼ cup chopped scallion
  • 10 oz., baby spinach leaves
  • ½ tsp. Dijon mustard
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • ¼ tsp. paprika

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Mix the breadcrumbs and butter.
  3. Press this dough into an oiled 9′ spring form pan.
  4. Bake for approximately 10 minutes, until it just starts to brown.
  5. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.
  6. Microwave the baby spinach leaves for 3 minutes in a covered glass container.
  7. Mix the cooked spinach with the rest of the ingredients in a large bowl.
  8. Pour the cheese mixture over the crust.
  9. Bake for 65 minutes.

Serve warm with fresh sliced fruit.

For an easy-to-prepare yet exotic feast, try a savory cheesecake this Shavuot.  With the addition of some fresh baguettes and a crisp green salad, a savory cheesecake becomes the centerpiece of an unforgettable Shavuot feast.