Schumer Speaks at AIPAC Policy Conference

On Tuesday, March 28, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) took to the podium at the AIPAC Policy Conference. In a heartfelt address peppered with personal anecdotes, he spoke to the strength of the bond between the United States and Israel. He discussed the recent rise of anti-Semitism in Europe and the United States. He also characterized the campaign to delegitimize Israel — waged by movements like BDS (Boycotts, Divestment and Sanctions) and by the United Nations — as a “cloaked” form of anti-Semitism. Finally, he called for unified support for Israel across the American political spectrum, and pledged, “[A]s long as HaShem breathes air into my lungs, I will fight to make Israel a safer, more secure, more prosperous nation.”

The transcript of Sen. Schumer’s speech, as provided on the AIPAC Policy Conference website, appears below. [Read more…]

American Jewish Committee: The Dean of American Jewish Organizations

The American Jewish Committee (AJC) The AJC was founded in 1906. The impetus for creating this organization was the news of the pogroms against Jews in the Russian Empire. The AJC’s mission was to “prevent infringement of the civil and religious rights of Jews and to alleviate the consequences of persecution,” no matter where they were occurring. The AJC is still going strong today, advocating for religious pluralism, Muslim-Jewish relations, and Jewish students on campus. One of the AJC’s most important areas of activism is in combating the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions Movement. [Read more…]

Who Asked You To Boycott?

“Who asked you to boycott Israeli companies?” questions Bassem Eid, a Palestinian human rights activist. It may be surprising to those unfamiliar with the on-the-ground economic conditions for Palestinians in the West Bank to hear him say, “We Palestinians are not boycotting them, so what do we need you to boycott them for?”

Bassem Eid was born in the Jordanian controlled part of the Old City of Jerusalem in 1958, and grew up in the Shuafat refugee camp. He became a journalist, and worked for B’Tselem, an Israeli non-profit organization whose goal was to document Israel’s human rights violations in the West Bank. In 1996, he founded the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group, whose mission is to monitor human rights violations by both Israel and the Palestinian National Authority. Bassem Eid has spent twenty-six years studying the United Nations organization that supports Palestinian refugees, UNRWA. He told me that his family’s experience was “of Arab leaders promising Palestinians short-term suffering for long-term benefit, since 1948. All we saw was long-term suffering. Everybody is using the Palestinians for their own gain. The United Nations, the Palestinian Authority, and others all make money by keeping us poor and dependent. For them, we are a business.” Mr. Eid is a vocal critic of the anti-Israel Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement. About the BDS activists he observed, “They are trying to survive on the conflict, attaching themselves to it in order to remain relevant. Most of them have no idea what the conflict is about, how Palestinians live with Israelis, or about coexistence.” He has come to believe that economic cooperation between Palestinians and Israelis, even where it involves Israeli-owned enterprises in the West bank, is a key to improving the economic situation of Palestinians and of forging the bonds of economic inter-dependence and trust required the create peace.

Eid’s emphasis on improving the economic conditions of Palestinians, and his willingness to see Palestinians partner with Israelis to achieve this, is exemplified by his current speaking tour. Eid is on a tour of the United States, sponsored by StandWithUs, a pro-Israel solidarity group, with Erez Zadok. Zadok, the Israeli CEO of Aviv Fund Management, invests in Israeli factories that employ Palestinians. Like Mr. Eid, he wonders why the BDS movement would want to deprive Palestinians of their livelihoods.

Erez Zadok, Israeli investor

Erez Zadok, Israeli investor

Erez Zadok invested in SodaStream three years ago. The company’s mission, through its location in the West Bank, was “to make peace, and to also make soda.” Israeli companies located in the West Bank must comply with Israeli law. “Palestinians working for Israeli companies in this region earn five times more than the Palestinians who work for Palestinians’ factories,” he explained. “This money enters the Palestinian economy and goes to private consumption, to buy food, clothes, shoes and other needs. These Palestinians support their families and other circles of Palestinians working to provide them with the goods and services they need,” he added.

Last September, SodaStream shut down its West Bank factory due to pressure from the BDS movement. It relocated to a new factory in the Negev, next to the Bedouin city of Rahat. Three hundred Bedouins now work for SodaStream. The Palestinians who lost those jobs will have a hard time finding a new source of livelihood in a region with 23% unemployment.

Soda Stream Seltzer Maker

Soda Stream Seltzer Maker

The new SodaStream factory is within Israel’s 1948 borders. The BDS movement is still promoting a boycott of its products. When SodaStream was in the West Bank, Palestinians and Israelis worked together under the same conditions, receiving the same benefits, and the same opportunities. Some of them befriended each other, trusted each other, and respected each other. According to Mr. Zadok, “SodaStream manufactured peace, co-existence and normalization between the peoples.”

Bassem Eid and Erez Zadok are working together to achieve peace. They don’t believe that boycotting Israel is the way to get there. Bassem Eid is finding a very receptive audience in the United States. “People are thirsty for first hand information,” he said. “My message is probably upsetting and provoking to many of them.” From his perspective, it’s time to stop blaming Israel for the problems of the Palestinians. “Refugees from every other country have rebuilt their lives after one generation. It’s time for the Palestinians to also pull themselves up and develop,” he concluded.

British Horse Expert Boycotts Israel By Snubbing 13-Year-Old Girl

Shachar Rabinovitch

Shachar Rabinovitch

A former Cambridge University professor refused to help a 13-year-old Israeli student with a research project, hiding behind the anti-Israel Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement for her decision.

Shachar Rabinovitch, 13, wrote to Professor Marsha Levine, a British-American researcher, requesting information about early horse species, Levine’s area of expertise. According to the girl’s mother, Levine replied: “I’ll answer your questions when there is peace and justice for Palestinians in Palestine.”

According to B’nai B’rith International, The goal of BDS is to isolate Israel to the point of dissolution:

This BDS episode illustrates the senselessness and degree to which BDS followers will go to follow the Palestinian narrative. Levine’s refusal to help a student demonstrates an extreme absurdity, with its total lack of proportion in its response to a student.

B’nai B’rith has long fought the BDS campaign to isolate Israel and its myopic focus on Israel, even as real human rights abusers, like Iran and Syria, escape unscathed.

Palestinian Speaks Against BDS — Or Not

Bassem Eid

Bassem Eid.

Bassem Eid, billed as the former director of the Jerusalem-based Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group, was born in Jerusalem but spent most of his life in a refugee camp.

Eid addressed an audience of close to 100 people on November 4, 2015 at Congregation Beth Hillel Beth El in Wynnewood. Continuing with a speaking tour that has taken him across the nation, Eid explained his claim that the boycott, divestment and sanctions program targeted at Israel (BDS) is harmful to Palestinians.

Eid’s talk was sponsored by Gratz College and the organization Scholars for Peace in the Middle East. David Weinstein, chairman of the Gratz Board of Governors, Yaron Seideman, Israeli consul in Philadelphia, and Jon Cohen, vice president of the Scholars for Peace organization, each gave introductions of the speaker and attacks on BDS.

Consul Seideman described BDS as anti-Semitic and an effort to “deprive Israel of a voice.” According to Cohen, Eid is a critic of the security forces of both Israel and the Palestinian Authority.

As Eid describes the problem of the Middle East, the issues are Hamas on the one hand, the Palestinian Authority under Abbas, and finally Israel. He blames Hamas for destroying economic recovery in Gaza that began in the period of Israeli control beginning in 1967. The PA, Abbas and Israel are blamed for entering agreements and then not moving forward to carry them out.

The disengagement of Israel from Gaza, according to Eid, was Prime Minister Sharon’s biggest mistake. By withdrawing and leaving a vacuum, Sharon allowed Hamas to take over and to claim credit for forcing Israel to withdraw. The Oslo Accords also have damaged the Palestinians, substituting a dictatorship of Abbas for the dictatorship of Arafat.

Today, according to Eid, all three parties are relatively satisfied. Hamas has Gaza, Israel transfers funds to the PA but maintains security, and Abbas has lost popularity and could not win an election but remains in full control.

BDS, says Eid, is just another organization sapping money that could otherwise be used to advance the welfare of Palestinians. He complains that the organization lacks transparency, but suspects that it is the “precursor of a genocide against Palestinians.” Its goal is to destroy both the Israeli and Palestinian economies. Boycott, he says, is not real but just “stickers” and posters playing on Arab cultural susceptibility and the force of nationalism.

Responding to questions from the audience, Eid reiterated his view that improving the Palestinian economy would relieve the conflict. Economics, not ideologies or religion, is the controlling force in his view.