The Kosher Table

The Kosher Table invites you to explore culinary trends and ingredients, and the way they are intertwined with Jewish history, geography, and traditions. We can meet innovative people who are influencing what we eat and how we consume it. Together, we can travel around the world and experience its diverse Jewish communities, and the native flavors found in their regional culinary specialties. We can discover our local farms, artisanal purveyors, and restaurants. We can investigate cookbooks, and Internet resources by and for people who are passionate about food.

Community members who are fervent about food and love to write are invited to submit articles, comments, questions, and feedback to Food Editor Ronit Treatman at food@pjvoice.org

Elementary School Foodies Recommend Healthy Recipes

— by Yehudeet Gore

IMG_0724At Torah Academy of Greater Philadelphia, first- and second-grade “foodies” are learning about smart eating in a group called Food Power, and they have some healthy snacks to share with The Philadelphia Jewish Voice.

Guided by the Choose My Plate format, the six students hope to become experts on the food groups and the importance of balanced meals and snacks. Nate Bleier, Irmiyahu Rubin, Yaakov Noam Shrager, Shira Ben Samuel, Ahuva Ludzker and Sruli Fineman have created “superfood superheroes,” played meal-building games, and prepared extra-nutritious “power snacks.” They even took a trip to Nana’s Kitchen to learn an all-senses lesson in herbs, and they created smoothies in all colors and tastes.

[Read more…]

Passover Meal Kit: Smoked Salmon and Beet Salad

By Jo Ferro

Martha Stewart & Marley Spoon, Martha Stewart’s meal delivery service, has created a delicious Passover meal kit. It contains everything necessary to create a beautiful smoked salmon,  beet and haroset salad. This delightful main course salad hits many traditional Passover elements: haroset (apple, walnut, raisin, and wine–vinegar) symbolizing the mortar used by slaves to build the pyramids, and horseradish and arugula, symbolizing the bitterness of slavery. It includes two heavy hitters of classic Jewish cuisine: beets and smoked salmon. [Read more…]

Tunisian Passover Fourma

IMG_0002One of the staples of the Tunisian table is the fourma, or molded noodle dish. Cooked noodles are mixed with spiced meat or vegetables. Eggs are beaten and used to bind the noodle mixture. The casserole is baked and served at any meal, hot or cold. The Jews of Tunisia have a special fourma recipe that they prepare for Passover.

Tunisian Jews eat kitniyot (grains and legumes) during Passover. The starch in the Passover fourma is rice, which has been carefully picked over and cleaned to make sure that there is no chametz in it. Those of you who don’t eat kitniyot during Passover may substitute the rice in the recipe for boiled, diced potatoes or matza farfel.

IMG_0007Passover Fourma
Adapted from Laurent

  • 1 cup cooked brown rice
  • 1 Lb. ground beef
  • 1 large onion, minced
  • 1 cup marinara sauce
  • 4 eggs, whisked
  • 1 bunch parsley, minced
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • Salt
  • Black pepper
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a heavy skillet.
  3. Brown the onion.
  4. Add the ground beef.
  5. Season with ground cinnamon, salt, and pepper.
  6. Mix in the parsley.
  7. Set aside and allow to cool.
  8. In a large bowl mix the rice, marinara sauce, meat, and eggs.
  9. Pour the mixture into an oiled casserole dish.
  10. Bake for about 45 minutes.
  11. Serve with harissa and a crispy green salad.

Shishi Israeli: Shabbat Experience With the Israeli American Council

Devorah Selber, in the maroon apron, and Mazal Fellah, in the striped apron, with volunteers cooking for Shishi Israeli.

Devorah Selber, in the maroon apron, and Mazal Fellah, in the striped apron, with volunteers cooking for Shishi Israeli.

Have you ever enjoyed an Israeli-style Shabbat dinner? They tend to be casual family get-togethers, with delicious home-cooked food. Even many secular Israelis still congregate for Shabbat dinner every Friday evening, sans the blessings. If you are not fortunate enough to have an Israeli relative to invite you, you may now join the Israeli American Council (IAC) community for potluck Shabbat dinners. The main courses are cooked at the venue by a group of volunteers, lead by Devorah Selber and Mazal Fellah. [Read more…]

Festive Bukharan Purim Bread

Photo by PRODebraj Ghosh https://www.flickr.com/photos/debraj/

Photo by PRO Debraj Ghosh

Jews have lived in the Central Asian city of Bukhara since the reign of King David. One of their unique Purim specialties is an intricately decorated flatbread called Kulchi Ravghaniy. Flatbreads have been baked in Bukhara for over 12,000 years, and are described in one of the world’s oldest written stories, The Epic of Gilgamesh. In Bukhara bread symbolizes life. Jews celebrate the life of Queen Esther and the Jewish community by serving these festive loaves during the Purim feast. [Read more…]

Food on the Brain: Top Brain Boosters and Brain Drainers

By Dr. Christopher Calapai

The foods you have in your pantry and fridge may be helping or hindering your brain. The foods we choose have a lot to do with how sharp, attentive, alert, focused and happy we feel after they are consumed. [Read more…]

Tu BiShvat Tagine

Photo by Serena Epstein https://www.flickr.com/photos/serenae/

Tagine Clay Pot. Photo by Serena Epstein.

In Morocco, the Jewish community would celebrate Tu BiShvat by gathering for a collective feast. Tu BiShvat is the New Year of the trees as described in the Mishna. The wealthiest family would serve a delectable slow cooked meat and dried fruit dish called a tagine. It was named after the special clay pot used to prepare the stew. Traditionally it was prepared with chicken or lamb, dried fruits, and nuts. When the feast ended, every person went home with their hat filled with a gift of various fruits.
You may celebrate with your friends and family with a taste of North African hospitality this Tu Bishvat. On February 10th, when winter is in full force in Philadelphia, serve an exotic fruity chicken tagine. Send your guests home with a care package of fresh or dried fruits, just like the parnassim of Casablanca, Tangiers, and Tetouan.

Photo by Scottish Association of Geography Teachers https://www.flickr.com/photos/sagtmorocco/

Chicken Tagine. Photo by Scottish Association of Geography Teachers.

Chicken Tagine with Honey and Dried Fruits
Adapted from Cuisine Marocaine

Ingredients:

  • 6 chicken drumsticks
  • 2 onions, chopped
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 cup dried dates
  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 1 cup vegetable broth
  • 4 tbsp. honey
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 2 tbsp. chopped cilantro
  • 1 tsp. ground ginger
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • Pinch of saffron threads
  • Salt and black pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Heat the olive oil in a heavy pot.
  2. Add the chicken and onions.
  3. Season with the ginger, cinnamon, saffron, salt, and pepper.
  4. Mix in the honey.
  5. Toast the almonds in a hot non-stick frying pan.
  6. Place the almonds in the pot.
  7. Add the dates, garlic, cilantro, and broth.
  8. Bring to a boil, cover the pot tightly with a lid, and lower the flame to a simmer.
  9. Cook for 30 minutes.
  10. Serve with fluffy steamed couscous.

Enjoy!

Akara: Black-Eyed Pea Fritters

What should you serve when the last night of Hanukkah abuts the secular New Year’s Eve? The Yoruba tribe of West Africa offers the perfect recipe for a mash-up of traditions. It makes it possible for you to combine the American southern custom of serving black-eyed peas for good luck with the Hanukkah tradition of serving latkes. The result is akara, one of the most popular snacks in West Africa. [Read more…]

Hanukkah Rosettes

639px-rosettecookieWould you like to serve a fried treat that is delicious and beautiful this Hanukkah? Surprise your family and friends with a delicate rose, created from batter, shaped by a metal cookie cutter, and cooked in olive oil. This ethereal treat harks back to ancient Persia, medieval German woodcutters, and the Ottoman Empire.

The technique of deep-frying foods originated in the Mediterranean in the 5th Century BCE. The most commonly used oil was olive oil. As traders took this art to Persia, cooks poured batter into the hot oil, and then immersed the fritter in a syrup of rosewater and sugar. In the 15th Century CE elaborate wooden molds were carved in Europe for shaping gingerbread cookies. Both the mold carving and gingerbread baking were controlled by guilds. In the 18th Century CE the wood was replaced by tin, and shaped cookies were democratized. Everyone could bake their own fancy cookies! The cooks of the Ottoman Empire brought all these traditions together to create a beautiful fritter called demir tatlisi. They dipped iron molds in the shape of flowers in batter and deep-fried them. A warm syrup of sugar, water, and lemon was allowed to simmer on the side. After all the cookies were fried, they were dipped in the syrup and served. Visiting European diplomats brought these recipes to Europe, where they were adopted. Scandinavia fell in love with the flower cookies, calling them Struva. The syrup was replaced with powdered sugar. When the British discovered them, they named them rosettes. You may surprise your Hanukkah guests with beautiful flower shaped fritters.

Hanukkah Rosettes
Adapted from Kari Diehl

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • Powdered sugar
  • Olive oil or vegetable oil
  • Special equipment: you will need a rosette mold https://www.amazon.com/Norpro-Swedish-Rosette-Timbale-3286/dp/B0000VLYB8

    1. Mix the flour, milk, eggs, sugar, vanilla extract, and salt.
    2. Refrigerate the batter for 2 hours.
    3. Heat the oil in a heavy pot to 360 degrees Fahrenheit.
    4. Pour the batter into a shallow casserole dish.
    5. Heat the rosette mold in the oil.
    6. Dip the hot mold in the batter so that the bottom and sides are coated, but not the top.
    7. Submerge the mold and batter in the hot oil.
    8. Fry until golden brown.
    9. Place the rosettes on a paper towel to blot the excess oil.
    10. Arrange the rosettes on a plate and sprinkle with powdered sugar.