The Kosher Table

The Kosher Table invites you to explore culinary trends and ingredients, and the way they are intertwined with Jewish history, geography, and traditions. We can meet innovative people who are influencing what we eat and how we consume it. Together, we can travel around the world and experience its diverse Jewish communities, and the native flavors found in their regional culinary specialties. We can discover our local farms, artisanal purveyors, and restaurants. We can investigate cookbooks, and Internet resources by and for people who are passionate about food.

Community members who are fervent about food and love to write are invited to submit articles, comments, questions, and feedback to Food Editor Ronit Treatman at [email protected]

Tabouli Cuisines: Philly’s Israeli Druze Outpost

As I was perusing the Ardmore Farmer’s Market for dinner ideas, a perfectly formed Maqluba, or molded savory cake made with rice, meat, and vegetables, caught my eye. It is so difficult to get this recipe to come out just right that I felt compelled to find out who the skilled cook was! Mona and Mohammed, the proprietors of Tabouli Cuisines, introduced themselves to me in flawless Hebrew.

Mona and Mohammed are from the Druze community of Majd al Shams in the Golan Heights. The Druze are Unitarians, who believe that they descend from Jethro of Midian. Mohammed’s father served in the Druze Battalion of the Israeli Defense Forces, and was killed in combat in the Yom Kippur War. Mohammed’s mother was left alone to care for her ten children. Mohammed was only ten years old. “It has been a very difficult road, but we have built something,” Mohammed told me.

The inspiration for their food stand came from Mona’s homemade Levantine cuisine. When they came to the United States, their children’s classmates would stay for dinner. When they extended these invitations to the adults as well, their guests loved the food so much that they starting placing special orders to cater festive occasions. Mona prepared everything in her home kitchen.

Eventually they decided to open a food stand. They have built up a loyal following, and I must say that after tasting their food I will be returning too. Everything is made from scratch, with recipes that have been handed down over generations. Apart from their incredible Maqluba, there are colorful, freshly cut salads, stuffed vegetables, kibi (bulgur croquets stuffed with meat), falafel, and baklava. There are many vegetarian and vegan options.

You may purchase their delicious foods at their stand at the Ardmore Farmer’s Market. Tabouli also offers a catering menu and delivery.

Tabouli Cuisines
Address: Ardmore Farmers Market,, 120 Coulter Avenue, Ardmore, PA 19003
Phone: (610) 896-3800

Aunt Katy’s Hungarian Yeast Cake

Photo: Alex Gall.

Shabbat in Israel has unspoken rituals. People eat lunch at around noon, and then rest until 4 p.m. No one calls or rings door bells during those four hours. After the siesta, social life begins again with cake and coffee. The streets fill with people on the way to their friends’ homes for an afternoon visit. Most hosts eschew the convenience of cake mixes or store-bought cakes. They take pride in their family recipes and the pastries they bake themselves. One of my most memorable coffee klatsch experiences was with my Aunt Katy. She baked her family’s Hungarian yeast cake, filled with walnuts from the tree in her garden. [Read more…]

Ten Commandments Surprise Cookies

My favorite inauthentic part of eating at a Chinese restaurant is the fortune cookie at the end of the meal. Many modern Chinese restaurants won’t serve fortune cookies because they are not part of the Chinese tradition. I decided to bake my version of these biscuits for Shavuot. Rather than containing fortunes, each cookie will celebrate the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai by revealing one of the Ten Commandments. My new tradition may be as American as the creation of the original fortune cookies. [Read more…]

Lag BaOmer Orange Infused Buns

In Israel, the arrival of Spring brings with it the smoky smell of Lag BaOmer bonfires. The outdoorsy Jewish holiday falls on May 3 this year, and where there will be fire, there will be creative outdoor cooking. In honor of Israel’s Jaffa oranges, here is a recipe for a truly sabra Lag BaOmer treat. This year you may try buns cooked in orange peels in the embers. If you do not have time to prepare the dough in advance, use refrigerated dough from the supermarket or brownie, cake, or muffin mix. If lighting a bonfire near where you live is completely out of the question, the outdoor grill or fire pit will do.

[Read more…]

Israeli Independence Day or Yom Ha’atzmaut Menu

Picture of pita bread pocket over stuffed with falafel and Israeli salad. Photo: David Weekly https://www.flickr.com/photos/dweekly/

Photo: David Weekly

We have been blessed to merit participation in the celebration of 70 years of the modern State of Israel. The dreams of countless Jews have been realized in our times. After the Holocaust, it was the goal of the survivors who participated in building the new State of Israel to create the “New Jew,” one who would be different than the ones in Europe before the war. This “New Jew” was the Sabra, the Israeli. Sabras were strong, proud Jews. They did not look, act, speak, or dress like their parents. They also did not eat the foods of Eastern Europe. They ate Israeli food such as pita, falafel, hummus, and olives. Lets celebrate this wonderful occasion with an Israeli falafel bar.

Your falafel bar may replicate the experience of going to a falafel stand in Israel. You may purchase most of the components of a falafel ready made. Your guests will be free to compose their falafel any way they like. You will need:

  • Pita bread
  • Falafel balls
  • Tahini
  • Hummus
  • Baba ganoush
  • Israeli salad
  • Olives
  • Pickled cucumbers

For your convenience, the only thing on this list that I recommend that you prepare from scratch is the Israeli salad. This salad is very versatile and open to interpretation. If you like you may add diced radishes, fresh mint leaves, or parsley. You may also omit anything you don’t like and strip it down to the basic tomato, cucumber and pepper salad. You may purchase the rest already prepared either refrigerated, canned, or frozen.

Close up picture of Israeli salad showing diced cucumber and tomato. Photo: Sharon Gefen - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15075904

Photo: Sharon Gefen

Israeli Salad

  • 1 tomato
  • 1 cucumber
  • 1 pepper
  • green onion, to taste
  • cilantro, to taste
  • 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • salt, to taste
  • black pepper, to taste
  1. Dice the tomato, cucumber, and pepper.
  2. Cut up the green onion and cilantro.
  3. Juice the lemon and add to the salad.
  4. Add the olive oil.
  5. Season with salt and black pepper.
  6. Toss well.

Easy Passover Cake Three Ways

Passover is a time of visiting with family and friends, as well as entertaining.

It is easier than you think to make a delicious home-baked dessert to sweeten these encounters: All you need is a torte to form the base, freshly whipped heavy cream, melted chocolate, nuts, and spring berries.

In my family, these cakes were rolled, with the filling on the inside. Something always goes wrong when I try this, so I just serve them like strawberry shortcakes.

For all of these cakes, preheat the oven to 350°F, and oil a 9-inch round cake pan. Note that peanuts, sesame seeds, and poppy seeds are kitniyot (not kosher for Passover).

Nut Cake

  • 2 3/4 cups toasted and ground walnuts, almonds, pistachios, pecans, hazelnuts, pine nuts, cashews, Macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, or coconut.
  • 1/2 cup cane sugar
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 7 eggs, separated
  1. Place the ground nuts, brown sugar, and salt in a bowl. Mix well.
  2. In a separate bowl, whip the egg yolks and the cane sugar for about 5 minutes.
  3. When the egg mixture is fluffy, fold it into the nut mixture.
  4. In a clean bowl, whip the egg whites.
  5. Fold 1/3 of the egg whites into the egg yolk mixture.
  6. Fold the rest of the egg whites into the batter.
  7. Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan.
  8. Bake for 60 minutes.
  9. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.

Sponge Cake

  • 1/4 cup matzo meal
  • 2 tablespoons potato flour
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 8 eggs, separated
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon orange zest
  1. Whip the egg yolks, orange zest, and 1 cup of sugar in a bowl.
  2. In a different bowl, whip the egg whites with 1/2 cup of sugar.
  3. Add the matzo meal, potato flour, and orange juice to the yolk mixture.
  4. Fold 1/3 of the egg whites into the yolk batter.
  5. Fold the rest of the egg whites into the batter.
  6. Pour the batter into a prepared cake pan.
  7. Bake for 70 minutes.
  8. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.

 


Photo by Tim Sackton. Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic.

Chocolate Cake

  • 6 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 2 cups ground almonds (or other nut of your choice)
  • 7/8 cup sugar
  • 10 eggs, separated
  1. Melt the chocolate chips in the microwave.
  2. Whip the yolks and sugar in a large bowl.
  3. Add the melted chocolate and ground almonds.
  4. Whip the egg whites in a separate bowl.
  5. Fold the egg whites into the chocolate mixture.
  6. Pour the batter into a prepared pan.
  7. Bake for 60 minutes.
  8. Remove the cake from the oven and allow it to cool.

All of these cakes are delicious unadorned, and pair very well with coffee or tea. However, you can have fun garnishing them. Here are some easy ideas you may use separately or together:

Whipped Cream

  • heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon brandy
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • nuts
  1. Whip the cream with the sugar and brandy.
  2. Spread the whipped cream over the cake.
  3. Sprinkle some nuts over the cream.

Alternatively, you can sprinkle some powdered sugar over your cake, melt some chocolate chips in the microwave and spread the melted chocolate over it, or garnish it with fresh spring berries.

Sephardic Seder Flavors

Too Good To Passover, by Jennifer Abadi, is an exploration of the diversity of Sephardic and Mizrahi Passover traditions. Abadi spent six years interviewing people from Jewish communities in Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Europe. Along with their sentimental memoirs, her subjects shared treasured family Passover recipes. [Read more…]

Drunken Purim Babka

Portrait of King Stanislaus Leszczyński.

To really celebrate Purim, we should consume so much alcohol that we cannot tell the difference between Haman and Mordechai. Unlike at all the other Jewish holidays, alcohol takes center stage during Purim. Why not extend this pleasure to all the recipients of your mishloach manot packages? Mishloach manot are the gifts of food that are traditionally given out during Purim. One delicious Purim food from the Polish Jewish community that can be added to a gift package is shikkor babka, or drunken babka. [Read more…]

“Milky” Chocolate Pudding: From Childhood Treat to Adult Extravagance

How can you steal someone’s heart? One effective way is to cook a dish that transports them back to a happy childhood memory. For many people that I grew up with in Israel, the treat that accomplishes this is called “Milky.” “Milky” is a chocolate pudding snack topped with whipped cream. It is manufactured by the Strauss Group near Tel Aviv. While many of us still love this childhood nosh exactly the way it is, it can be fun to prepare our own grownup homemade version of it.

Preparing a dessert like “Milky” is not very difficult. You begin with a base of chocolate pudding made from scratch. Give it an adult touch by adding any combination of whisky, rum, chocolate liqueur, or coffee liqueur to it. Then, you may whip your own heavy cream to garnish the pudding. A final elegant touch of chocolate shavings turns a childhood treat into a refined adult extravagance.

Photo pudding with whipped cream and chocolate. by pengrin https://www.flickr.com/photos/pengrin/

Pudding. Photo: Pengrin

Homemade Chocolate Pudding

  • 5 squares quality dark chocolate, chopped
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 2 tbsp. cornstarch
  • 6 tbsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 cup liquor
  1. Mix the cornstarch, sugar, and cocoa in a pot.
  2. Add the milk, and cook over low heat, stirring constantly.
  3. Remove the pot from the flame when the pudding has thickened.
  4. Stir in the chopped chocolate and vanilla extract.
  5. Pour the pudding into a glass bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and place in the refrigerator.

To serve:

  1. Mix the chocolate pudding with 1 cup of the liquor of your choice. You may combine several types of liquor.
  2. Cover with plastic wrap and return to the refrigerator for 30 minutes.
  3. Prepare the whipped cream.

Whipped cream

  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
  1. Combine the heavy cream and sugar together in a bowl.
  2. Whisk until the cream forms stiff peaks.

Add toppings

  1. Spoon some chocolate pudding into a small bowl.
  2. Top with whipped cream.
  3. Garnish with chocolate shavings.

The Big Schmear: Jewish Food Podcast

— by Samantha Voxakis

Beth Schenker sitting at a desk recording The Big Schmear podcast.

Beth Schenker recording The Big Schmear podcast.

The Big Schmear is a new podcast about all things Jewish food that invites you to listen while you nosh. Lovers of Jewish food, Jewish foodies, and people who just love to eat will enjoy hearing episodes featuring conversations with chefs, food authors, and restaurant critics.

“For me, Jewish food is ingrained in my identity: it connects me with my past through the
mem­ories of holiday meals shared with family and friends and it links me to the future as I
develop my own traditions,” said Beth Schenker, host and executive producer of The Big
Schmear. “This is truly a passion project for me and I hope to share the joys of Jewish food with
as many listeners as possible.”

An experienced producer, Beth has created numerous radio documentaries. For the past ten years she has served as the Assistant Dean for Jewish Studies/Director of Public Programming at Spertus Institute of Jewish Learning and Leadership in Chicago.

Upcoming episodes will feature an inside look at Kosherfest, an annual one-of-a kind, business to business, industry food conference, and episodes with famed cookbook author and Israeli food critic, Gil Hovav. New episodes of The Big Schmear will be posted on the second and fourth Monday of each month.