Arts & Culture

We welcome you to send us any news you might have regarding the vibrant arts and culture scene here in Philadelphia. If you have books to review, theatre productions, music, or museum exhibits please feel free to contact Art & Culture Editor Lisa Grunberger at [email protected]

Seven Decades of Israeli Film

Scene of two men sitting at a table eating from the movie "Maktub" (Fate)

The movie “Maktub” (Fate)

It has been 70 years since Israel declared its independence.  So this year, the Israeli Film Festival of Philadelphia (IFF) will showcase films that highlight different aspects of the region’s history. The movies will be shown at various locations in Philadelphia and the nearby suburbs from March 3 to March 25.

Several of the documentaries and feature films epitomize the struggles that the infant Israeli nation underwent as it transitioned from survival mode to inclusion. Others deal with the acceptance of minorities, modern day dilemmas, and affairs of the heart. [Read more…]

“Lenny’s Revolution” Celebrates Leonard Bernstein – and the Eagles Too


Philly POPS and an Eagles mascot forming a conga line. Photo: The Philly POPS Facebook page.

“Fly, Eagles, fly on the road to victory.”

As one would expect, the 2018 Super Bowl Champions’ anthem has been sung across Philly, from sports bars to the victory parade on February 9. But one might not expect The Philly POPS to also get into the green.

But that’s exactly what the orchestra did at the Kimmel Center during “Lenny’s Revolution,” a tribute concert to the legendary composer Leonard Bernstein. [Read more…]

Lenny’s Revolution: A Centennial Bernstein Celebration With David Charles Abell

By now you must have seen all the ads announcing Lenny’s Revolution: A Centennial Bernstein Celebration, with David Charles Abell and The Philly POPS. Maestro Abell, the principal guest conductor of the 65-piece Philly POPS orchestra, is flying back from London for the Leonard Bernstein celebration concerts, which will be held on February 2 – 4 at the Kimmel Center.

I was able to interview Mr. Abell (pronounced “uh-BELL”) by phone while he was in London. During our conversation, he shared his Philadelphia roots with me, and mentioned that he still has relatives who live in Chestnut Hill. [Read more…]

Ode to Arthur

Arthur Koestler.

By Marie Miguel

There are certainly more than enough horrific tales of how the persecuted lived under fascism in the middle of the 20th century, and indeed dozens of books with “Koestler” on their covers.

“Scum of the Earth” is a unique kind of autobiographical adventure, a guide to suffering atrocious treatment with as much good humor as possible. The book also describes  how a totalitarian regime can subvert the morals of both states and individuals.

For someone who wasn’t actually a criminal, Arthur Koestler certainly saw the inside of a large number of cells. Reprising this aspect of his personal history is possibly the best way to explain what the reader can expect from “Scum of the Earth.”

[Read more…]

Edmund Weisberg: From Bioethicist to Children’s Book Author

Local Philadelphia author Edmund Weisberg wears a lot of hats: science writer, bioethicist, nutritionist, editor, social activist — and children’s book author. In 2016, Weisberg realized a dream. After raising $7,600 through a Kickstarter campaign, he published his manuscript for the children’s book While You’re at School, which he had written 16 years earlier. It is a beautiful book in rhymed verse, which provides a series of quirky responses to a question raised by a little boy: “What do you do while I’m at school, Mom?”

Edmund Weisberg.

[Read more…]

“The Ruined House” – A Collision Between Traditional and Contemporary Jewish Life

A Sapir Prize-winning novel, The Ruined House, by Jerusalem-born Ruby Namdar, is a highly imaginative and illuminating portrayal of the struggle between the spiritual and corporeal domains of mankind. It tells the story of two houses: the ancient Temple in Jerusalem, host to the soul of a people, and Andrew P. Cohen, host to the soul of a man. Both houses flourished, until outside forces and inner flaws laid siege to their protective walls leaving them lying in ruins. [Read more…]

Ken Stern’s “Republican Like Me”: Building Bridges Within a Two-Party Country

By Steve Wenick

I was intrigued by the title of the book, Republican Like Me by Ken Stern, because the author was the former CEO of NPR and a life-long Democrat. Like virtually all of his family and friends, Stern readily admits that he spent his life enclosed in a liberal bubble. But his is a story of how he managed to burst that bubble and venture forth to environs unknown to him while keeping his liberal principles and values intact. [Read more…]

Author Chronicles His Life From Childhood in Nazi Germany to Success in America

Mazel tov” is the customary exuberant response to the sound of shattering glass at the conclusion of a Jewish wedding ceremony. But for a young Fred (Fritz) Behrend, the sound of breaking glass meant anything but celebration.

The harrowing events that defined the formative years of Behrend’s life are chronicled in an engrossing book that he co-authored with Larry Hanover, Rebuilt from Broken Glass: A German Jewish Life Remade in America. In this book, we learn about the years leading up to the Holocaust as witnessed though the eyes of a young boy who led a life of innocence and privilege. But in 1938, when he was 13, the life he knew was abruptly shattered by the event known as Kristallnacht (Night of Broken Glass). [Read more…]

Book Review: “Start Without Me”

Start Without Me is a highly readable novel by Joshua Max Feldman. The protagonists, Adam, a recovering alcoholic musician, and Marissa, a married, one-nighter-mistake, flight attendant, both learn that living with their poor choices in life can be easier than coping with the decisions they inevitably must make going forward.

It is a story of love, but not of lovers, strangers whose chance meeting in an airport lounge finds Adam and Marissa supportive of each other’s need to shore up the courage to return home to family on a fateful Thanksgiving morning. In often colorful and graphic prose Feldman carves out a tale of self-effacement, good intentions, failure, and hope. With Thanksgiving dinner looming for both Adam and Marissa, it’s not about turkey and pumpkin pie; it’s about a slice of life they must learn to swallow without it consuming them.

If you dread looming family reunions at Thanksgiving, or any other time for that matter, this book will help shepherd you through the valley of anxieties that may be churning in the pit of your stomach. It will renew your faith in the strength and resilience of the human spirit and the inherent compassion that defines our humanity.


From the Book of Life to the Book of Lewis: Richard Lewis Returns to Philadelphia

This article is a sequel to a piece written by the author for The Philadelphia Jewish Voice in 2016.

After we have so recently been inscribed in the Book of Life during the High Holidays, some choice laughs are definitely in order. Fortunately, for the Philadelphia Jewish community, Richard Lewis is returning to Philadelphia, to perform his comedy, October 19 – 21, at the Helium Comedy Club. [Read more…]