The Healthy Break-Fast

Glass of water. Photo: Derek Jensen (Tysto) (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Photo: Derek Jensen (Tysto)

At the conclusion of the 25-hour Yom Kippur fast, your body deserves some tender loving care. The foods that are traditionally served to break the fast do not necessarily provide this. Here are some tips on the scientifically healthiest ways to replenish your body with nutrients.

Note: If you are reading this before the start of the fast, check out Strategic Feasting Before Fasting.

Water

The first thing to give your parched body is water. Indulge in one or two glasses of water before you approach the food.

Display of carved fruit. Photo by Tracy Hunter https://www.flickr.com/photos/tracyhunter/

Photo: Tracy Hunter

Fresh Fruit

While fresh fruit is usually served toward the end of the meal, following a fast it is good to begin with the fruit. Fruits are easy to digest, and give your body additional fluids and sugars. Apples, grapes, watermelon, pears, and melons are good choices. Avoid citrus fruits, as they may be too acidic at this point.

Salad of dark green leafy vegetables. Photo by Connoisseur 4 The Cure https://www.flickr.com/photos/73887528@N08/

Photo: Connoisseur 4 The Cure

Fresh Vegetables

A salad with a base of romaine lettuce, kale, or Swiss chard will provide vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients to bring your body back into equilibrium. Add some chopped raw carrots, celery, and beets. Avoid commercial salad dressings, which contain too much salt. Make your own simple dressing with salt, pepper, olive oil, and a little lemon, or a yogurt (with live cultures) dressing.

Egg. Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons

Photo: Marie-Lan Nguyen

Eggs

Eggs are the most complete sources of protein. They are easy to digest, and quick to prepare. Serve some boiled eggs with the salad to renew your energy.

Vegetable Soup

Whip up a quick water-based vegetable soup with whole grains such as unpearled barley or brown rice and legumes such as lentils or beans. Use fresh vegetables, and to save time, canned legumes and quick cooking brown rice or barley.

Here is a recipe for a quick and easy vegetable soup that you can make from scratch:

Photo by Katrin Morenz https://www.flickr.com/people/26242865@N04

Photo: Katrin Morenz

Vegetable Soup
Adapted from About Food

  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 2 celery ribs, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 sweet potato, chopped
  • 1 zucchini, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 8 cups water
  • 1 tsp. dried thyme
  • 1 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1 dried bay leaf
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  1. Heat the oil in a heavy pot.
  2. Add all the chopped vegetables.
  3. Sauté for 4 minutes.
  4. Stir in the dry spices.
  5. Pour in the 8 cups of water.
  6. Bring the soup to a boil, and then simmer for 15 minutes.

You may add cooked beans, lentils, or garbanzo beans.
Serve with quick cooking brown rice or another whole grain.

Strategic Feasting Before Fasting

During the 25-hour fast of Yom Kippur, many people suffer from dehydration, low sugar levels, and lack of caffeine. It is much easier to persevere and achieve success if you prepare well in advance.

Wean Yourself From Caffeine:

Photo: Nevit Dilmen

Photo: Nevit Dilmen.

The one thing regular coffee drinkers miss the most during Yom Kippur is coffee. They miss caffeine even more than water.

Coffee consumers should taper off their caffeine consumption during the week before Yom Kippur.

Avoid Dehydrating Foods:
[Read more…]

Sephardic Stuffed Rosh Hashanah Vegetables

Some Sephardic families have the tradition of not preparing any black foods during Rosh Hashanah in order to avoid the appearance of mourning. The mothers and grandmothers of these clans are famous for their delicious stuffed vegetables. For Rosh Hashanah, this dish is still prepared, using everything that is in season, except eggplants, black olives and dark raisins. Stella Cohen, the author of Stella’s Sephardic Table, shares her recipe for the queens of stuffed vegetables. [Read more…]

Back-to-School Bento Box

“What should I pack for lunch?” is a question many parents grapple with at the beginning of the school year. It’s not as simple as it seems to provide a healthy, nutritious meal that will actually be eaten by your child. One fun and creative solution is to send your child to school with your version of the Japanese bento box. [Read more…]

A la Karte: Boutique Kosher Catering

If you keep kosher, and you need to attend a business lunch in a non-kosher restaurant, what do you do? If you have a large family, and you are charged with cooking a kosher holiday meal for everyone, who can you call? If your family is Ashkefardic, and you would like to please all of their palates, who can cook authentically for both traditions? The answer is A la Karte Boutique Cuisine & Catering.

You don’t need to bring a brown bag to a lunch meeting in a non-kosher restaurant. Thanks to A la Karte, you may order something off the menu, and your dish will be kosher, while your lunch companions will get the regular restaurant fare. How is this possible? A la Karte has an arrangement with several restaurants in the Greater Philadelphia area to provide kosher versions of that particular restaurant’s cuisine. Of all of A la Karte’s boutique offerings, this one grabbed my attention the most.

IMG_0115With Rosh Hashanah approaching, many of us are planning a festive meal for our family and friends. It’s a lot of work! A la Karte is a wonderful resource. It is possible to order all of the traditional recipes from the extensive menu, no matter how large your group is. Best of all, A la Karte will deliver.

Ofelia Cohen, the proprietor of A la Karte, was born in Caracas, Venezuela. Coincidentally, I also grew up in Caracas, where the Jewish community was half Ashkenazi and half Sephardic. Both of us celebrated the Jewish holidays with Ashkenzi and Sephardic friends. We are used to serving foods from both traditions at our festive meals. A la Karte offers a unique menu for Rosh Hashanah, which features many of the foods, we remember enjoying during our childhood. You will find traditional Eastern European fare such as gefilte fish next to fiery North African chraime.

AaW_ic_L7mZg5z1rCVjHjyLTfGq5Chef Cohen trained as an architect before she fell in love with food. This background is put to good use in a service she calls tablescaping. For those who are too busy or artistically challenged to set a beautiful holiday table, Ofelia is available to take care of it.

She just signed a lease for a new location in Bala Cynwyd. A la Karte will be moving to the space currently occupied by Coopermarket, at 302 Levering Mill Road. Her vision is to create a prepared food kosher mini market. It will serve take out lunch or dinner, with eat-in option in a communal table. She hopes that guests of different walks of life have conversations there. She would like to see interactions between Orthodox, Reform, Conservative and totally secular Jews, all enjoying delicious kosher food together.

Dear Incoming College Freshman,

StandWithUs, Your Campus Partner For Israelimage007

Hey There College Freshman,

Congratulations on entering college! We’re guessing that you’re pretty excited right about now, and maybe even a little nervous. You’re entering a whole new world – one that offers you the opportunity to not only have fun and grow into the person you want to be, but also to meet new friends and make a positive impact on the people around you. Our team here at StandWithUs is excited for you, and we wanted you to know that we’re here to empower you in many different ways. From educational resources about Israel and connections with the pro-Israel community to grants and internship opportunities, we’ve got your back every step of the way. [Read more…]

Lure Your Bashert with Roasted Grapes

640px-PikiWiki_Israel_3078_Ein_HahoreshSince the days of the Temple in Jerusalem, single women celebrated the beginning of the grape harvest by wearing white dresses and dancing in the vineyards. They were hoping to attract the attention of potential husbands. If pleasing the eye did not prove to be enough, some of them could try to reach their man’s heart through his stomach. An easy and delicious dish that was prepared during the grape harvest in Ancient Israel was freshly picked grapes, sprinkled with whatever herbs were growing in the vicinity, and roasted over an open fire. This was a savory treat, enjoyed with freshly baked flatbread. Its heady aroma could attract the men that may have been oblivious to the beauty of the Israelite women.

This tradition continues — in a more modernized form — in Israel today. When the sun sets this year on August 18, it will mark the beginning of the holiday of Tu b’Av, the Jewish celebration of love. Men and women dress in white and participate in various community events in the hopes of meeting their bashert (soulmate).

A fun activity you can try is to visit a farm that will let you pick your own grapes. If that is not possible, visit a farmer’s market, and buy the freshest grapes you can find. Roast them on your barbecue grill or in your oven.

Photo credit: F Delventhal

Photo credit: F Delventhal


Roasted Grapes

  • 1 cup fresh grapes
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 1 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp. vinegar
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 °F.
  2. Mix all the ingredients.
  3. Place in an oven-safe dish.
  4. Roast for 15 minutes.
  5. Serve with fresh pita bread, Israeli goat cheese and olives.

Adapted from The View from Great Island

Pope Meets the Founder of Shavei Israel

SHAVEI-1Pope Francis met with Shavei Israel Founder and Chairman Michael Freund in Krakow. As part of his visit to Poland, Francis travelled to the former extermination camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Polish Chief Rabbi Michael Schudrich introduced Pope Francis to Freund, whose organization, Shavei Israel, aims to strengthen the ties between the Jewish people, the State of Israel and the descendants of Jews around the world.

Francis and Freund discussed how a growing number of young Poles are rediscovering their Jewish roots. Today there are approximately 4,000 Jews registered as living in Poland, but experts suggest there may be tens of thousands of others throughout the country who are either hiding their identities or are simply unaware of their heritage. In recent years, a growing number of such people, popularly known as the “Hidden Jews of Poland” have begun to return to Judaism and to the Jewish people.

Ceviche: A Sephardic Gift to Peru

A Niche for Peruvian Fish Dish of Cevice at your Shabbat Tisch!

 

The origin of ceviche, the Peruvian national dish of fish in a citrus marinade, may be a Jewish Sabbath dish from the Iberian Peninsula. Some experts believe that a type of ceviche existed in Peru long before the Spanish arrived, in the form of raw fish flavored with fermented passionfruit juice. Escabeche is a type of fish dish that was typically served during Shabbat dinner in Spain, Portugal, and North Africa. The Jews adopted this method of preparation from the Persians. It was so well loved that it was even mentioned in “One Thousand and One Nights,” the collection of Arab folk tales.

To prepare escabeche, very fresh fish was cleaned and mixed with vinegar, olive oil, fresh laurel leaves, whole peppercorns, and wine. It was allowed to “cook” in this liquid for several hours. The escabeche was served cold. When America was colonized, many Sephardic Jews left the Iberian Peninsula to escape the Spanish Inquisition. They brought their recipes with them.

The conquistadores brought citrus fruits and onions with them to America. The recipes for escabeche were tweaked in the New World, and perhaps fused with the local Native Ameircan traditions. Sardines, Tuna, Mackerel, Hake, and Cod were used to make escabeche in Spain and Portugal. In Peru, Sea Bass and Flounder are popular choices in the preparation of ceviche. Instead of vinegar, fresh lime was used in the marinade.

This summer, try this refreshing way of preparing fish.

Photo by PROFoodie Buddha https://www.flickr.com/photos/foodiebuddha/

Photo by PROFoodie Buddha

Ceviche Clasico
Adapted from Pisco Trail

  • 1/4 Lb. very fresh sole or salmon (preferably sushi grade), cubed.
  • 1/2 tsp. salt.
  • 1/2 tsp. minced jalapeno pepper.
  • 1 tbsp. minced red onion.
  • 5 thin slices habanero pepper.
  • 1 boiled sweet potato, cubed.
  • Fresh coriander, minced.
  • 2 limes, juiced.
  1. Place the fish, salt, lime, onion, jalapeno and habanero peppers, sweet potato, and coriander in a bowl.
  2. Serve on a small plate.

Jerusalem Facts for the Democratic National Convention

The Democratic and Republican parties will meet soon in Philadelphia and Cleveland and adopt their party platforms. They will address questions about Jerusalem.

Before they make this important decision, it is important to make sure they have the facts straight. StandWithUs has created this educational fact sheet about Jerusalem to distribute to members of the platform committee as well as to other convention delegates and key policymakers:
[Read more…]