Responding Jewishly to Trump Withdrawing the US From the Paris Climate Pact

By Richard H. Schwartz, Ph.D.

President Donald Trump announcing the U.S. withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord. Photo courtesy of CNN.

President Donald J. Trump has received well-deserved condem­nation from leaders of many nations, governors and mayors, environ­mentalists, corporate CEOs, Jewish and other religious organizations, and others, for withdrawing the United States from the 2015 Paris climate change pact that was agreed to by all the 195 nations that attended, including Israel and the United States. How should Jews respond to the U.S. withdrawal?

First Jews should become very familiar with the issues involved. Ten important climate-related factors that Jews should be aware of are:

  1. Science academies worldwide, 97% of climate scientists, and 99.9% of peer-reviewed papers on the issue in respected scientific journals argue that climate change is real, is largely caused by human activities, and poses great threats to humanity. All 195 nations at the December 2015 Paris climate change conference agreed that immediate steps must be taken to combat climate change.
  2. Carbon dioxide levels from Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii

    Every decade since the 1970s has been warmer than the previous decade and all of the 17 warmest years since temperature records were kept in 1880 have been since 1998. 2016 is the warmest year globally since 1880, when temperature records were first kept, breaking the record held before by 2015 and previously by 2014, meaning we now have had three consecutive years of record temperatures..

  3. Polar icecaps and glaciers worldwide  have been melting rapidly, faster than scientific projections. This has caused an increase elevation in oceans worldwide with the potential for major flooding.
  4. There has been an increase in the number and severity of droughts, wildfires, storms, and floods.
  5. California has been subjected to so many severe climate events (heat waves, droughts, wildfires, and mudslides when heavy rains occur) recently that its governor, Jerry Brown, stated that, “Humanity is on a collision course with nature.” California serves as an example of how climate change can wreak havoc.
  6. Many climate experts believe that we are close to a tipping point due to positive feedback loops, when climate change will spiral out of control, with disastrous consequences, unless major positive changes soon occur.
  7. While many climate scientists think that 350 parts per million (ppm) of atmospheric CO2 is a threshold value for climate stability, the world reached 400 ppm in 2015, and the amount is increasing by 2 – 3 ppm per year.
  8. While climate scientists hope that temperature increases can be limited to two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), largely because that is the best that can be hoped for with current trends and momentum, the world is now on track for an average increase of 4 – 6 degrees Celsius, which would result in great human suffering and significant threats to human civilization.
  9. The Pentagon and other military groups think that climate change will increase the potential for instability, terrorism, and war by reducing access to food and clean water and by causing tens of millions of desperate refuges fleeing from droughts, wildfire, floods, storms, and other effects of climate change.
  10. The conservative group ConservAmerica formerly known as “Republicans for Environmental Protection,” is very concerned about climate change threats. They are working to end the
    denial about climate threats and the urgency of working to avert them on the part of the vast majority of Republicans, but so far with very limited success.

Second, Jews should consider Judaism’s powerful teachings that can be applied to environmental sustainability. These include:

  1. “In the hour when the Holy One, Blessed be He, created the first man, he took him and let him pass before all the trees in the Garden of Eden and said to him: ‘See my works, how fine and excellent they are. Now all that I created I created for your benefit. Think upon this and do not corrupt or destroy my world. For if you destroy it, there is no one to restore it after you.’” (Midrash: Ecclesiastes Rabbah 7:28)
  2. Genesis 2:15 indicates that the human role is to work the land but also to guard and preserve it. Jews are mandated to be shomrei ha’adama, “guardians of the earth,” co-workers with God in working for tikkun olam, healing and repairing the world.
  3. Judaism teaches: “Who is the wise person? The one who considers the future consequences of his or her actions.” (Tamid 32a)
  4. The Jewish sages extended Deuteronomy 20:19, 20, prohibiting the destruction of fruit trees in wartime to build battery rams to overcome an enemy fortification, to make a general prohibition against unnecessarily destroying anything of value.

Jews participating in 2014 climate march. Photo by Jon Leiner.

Given the above, Jews should be in the forefront of efforts to help avert a climate catastrophe. We should strive to make tikkun olam a central focus of all aspects of Jewish life today. We should try to significantly reduce our individual carbon footprints by recycling, using efficient light bulbs and other items, eating less meat, reducing our use of automobiles by walking, biking, sharing rides, and using mass transit, when appropriate, and in other ways. We should actively support efforts to increase efficiencies of automobiles and other items, shift to renewable sources of energy, and other societal steps that reduce greenhouse emissions. We should try to arrange programs on climate change at synagogues, Jewish centers, and other Jewish venues, write letters to editors, speak to family members, friends, neighbors, an co-workers, and take other steps to increase awareness of the seriousness of climate threats and how applying Jewish values can help reduce them. In summary we should do everything possible to reduce climate change and to help shift our imperiled planet onto a sustainable path.

 

Richard H. Schwartz, Ph.D. is a Professor Emeritus of College of Staten Island. Author of Judaism and Vegetarianism, Judaism and Global Survival, Mathematics and Global Survival, and Who Stole My Religion? Revitalizing Judaism and Applying Jewish Values to Help Heal Our Imperiled Planet, and over 250 articles at JewishVeg.org/schwartz
Trump’s announcement of withdrawing the U.S. from the Paris Climate Accord:

Recently elected French President Emmanuel Macron denounces Trump’s climate skepticism and announces a website offering four-year grants of to American researchers, businessmen, teachers and students to work in France on climate change.

I have a message for you guys.

Posted by Emmanuel Macron on Thursday, February 9, 2017

 

Other Philadelphia Jewish Voice articles on climate change:

Thousands of Jews Participate in People’s Climate March

Protecting Creation: A Jewish Response to Climate Change

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