We Can Create Our Own Minute Of Silence

Ilana Romano (widow of Yossef Romano victim of 1972 terrorist attack) is right: There should be a minute of silence at the London Olympic Opening Ceremony to remember the victims of the 1972 Munich Olympic terrorist attacks 40 years ago.

It does not matter that IOC President Jacques Rogge says no (probably out of fear of Iran’s reactions). The athletes and spectators should take matters into their own hands. I suggest we do this as the athlete parade into the stadium on Friday under their nation’s banner. Once the Israeli delegation has entered, the Israeli delegation simply stops marching and stand at attention for 60 seconds.

More after the jump.

Photo: Israeli Olympic team at the Opening Ceremonies, August 26, 1972 in Munich before the September 5 terrorist attack killed 11 Israeli athletes and coaches.
Italy follows Israel in marching order, so if Italy is agreeable, this should be done after they enter instead. 140 Italian members of Parliament have called for a minute of silence, so they might be persuaded to join in. (Following Italy is Jamaica and Japan. Preceding Israel is Ireland. I don’t know where they stand on this issue.)

Share:

Comments

  1. Ofir Shamay says

    Maccabi World Union president, Giora Esrubilsky, has sent a letter to the heads of Maccabi branches worldwide to mark the occasion with prayers and a minute’s silence

    Following the letter, over 60 branches and synagogues have complied with the initiative

    In addition, the “International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame” museum calls viewers to turn off the TV during the raising of the Olympic flags in the opening ceremony

    The Jewish world could not stay indifferent the Olympic Committee’s refusal to spend a minute’s silence in remembrance of the 11 Munich games victims. Maccabi World Union president, Giora Estrubilsky, has sent a letter to all of the heads of Maccabi branches worldwide expressing his offense by the Olympic Committee’s refusal, and calls all branches to mark the occasion.

    Following the letter, over 60 branches of Maccabi World Union and synagogues have decided to respond to the initiative with prayers and a minute’s silence in memory of the athletes. Among the approvers up to now: the United States, Finland, Hungary, Australia, Ecuador, Uruguay, Panama, Venezuela, Guatemala, Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Italy, South Africa, and Slovakia.

    In addition, the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame museum calls to all Jews to turn off their televisions for one minute during the raising of the flags in the Olympic opening ceremony.

Leave a Reply